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Everyday ReligionObserving Modern Religious Lives$
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Nancy T. Ammerman

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195305418

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305418.001.0001

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 Virtually Boundless?: Youth Negotiating Tradition in Cyberspace

 Virtually Boundless?: Youth Negotiating Tradition in Cyberspace

Chapter:
(p.83) 5 Virtually Boundless?: Youth Negotiating Tradition in Cyberspace
Source:
Everyday Religion
Author(s):

Mia Lövheim

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305418.003.0005

Sweden is often categorized as one of the most secularized and postmodern countries in the world. The Internet has been described as the “epitome” of transformations of traditional religion in late modern society. This chapter analyzes how youth negotiate religious conventions in discussions of religion on the Internet. If there is a “test case” for the breakdown of religious conventions based on the traditionalized beliefs and practices of institutionalized religion and traditional modes of religious socialization, this would be it. It is argued that despite these anticipations, the construction of religious identities, even in the transient sites of late modern society, is not only a question of individual choice in a “spiritual marketplace”, but also structured by religious authorities and conventions.

Keywords:   Sweden, Internet, youth, religious conventions, identities, choice, secularized, postmodern

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