Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Rebels RisingCities and the American Revolution$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Benjamin L. Carp

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195304022

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195304022.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 December 2018

ORDERLY AND DISORDERLY MOBILIZATION IN THE TAVERNS OF NEW YORK CITY

ORDERLY AND DISORDERLY MOBILIZATION IN THE TAVERNS OF NEW YORK CITY

Chapter:
(p.62) Chapter 2 ORDERLY AND DISORDERLY MOBILIZATION IN THE TAVERNS OF NEW YORK CITY
Source:
Rebels Rising
Author(s):

Benjamin L. Carp (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195304022.003.0003

City dwellers collected together in taverns to eat and drink, converse, exchange news and information, and debate politics. New York City stood at the pinnacle of alcohol consumption, communication, and sociability in the American colonies. New York's taverns and grogshops frequently played host to British officers, troops, and sailors, bringing the Sons of Liberty and friends of government face to face. Clubs and associations, laws and polite hierarchies were in place to maintain an orderly tavern setting. Yet rebels and other dissenters often capitalized on the entropic, drunken atmosphere of taverns to create societal disorder and political upheaval. In the complex world of New York politics, whichever faction could organize and rally tavern companies would have the greatest success at mobilizing the populace. During the imperial crisis, taverns or public houses brought together a cross‐class political network that was necessary for the coherence of a revolutionary alliance.

Keywords:   New York City, taverns, drinking, alcohol, sociability, Sons of Liberty, clubs, associations, communication, disorder

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .