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Rebels RisingCities and the American Revolution$

Benjamin L. Carp

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195304022

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195304022.001.0001

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(p.225) APPENDIX 1 Population Estimates for the Largest American Cities, 1740–83

(p.225) APPENDIX 1 Population Estimates for the Largest American Cities, 1740–83

Source:
Rebels Rising
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

(p.225) APPENDIX 1

Population Estimates for the Largest American Cities, 1740–83

1740

1750

1760

1770

Prewar High

Wartime Low

Philadelphia

10,117

13,926

18,598

26,789

32,073 (1775)

16,000 (1776) to 24,000 (1778)

New York

<10,000

13,300

∼15,000

21,000

∼25,000 (1775)

5,000 (1776)

Boston

16,800

15,890

15,631

15,520

16,540 (1771)

3,500 (1776)

Charleston

6,300

8,200

9,700

11,500

12,800 (1776)

8,000 (1782)

Newport

6,200

>6,508

7,500

9,000

9,209 (1774)

2,300 (1776) to 5,530 (1782)

Note: Population estimates probably undercount the population of mariners, transients, laborers, servants, unmarried youths, the poor, and other people in the cities. See, for instance, Marietta and Rowe, Troubled Experiment, 90–93; Pencak, War, Politics, and Revolution, 205; Kulikoff, “Progress of Inequality,” 403; Price, “American Port Towns,” 137.

Sources: All Philadelphia figures are from Klepp, “Demography in Early Philadelphia,” 100, 104–105. Figures for New York in 1740, 1760, and prewar are based on estimates in Nash, Urban Crucible, 407–9, while figures for 1750, 1770, and wartime are from Schultz, “Urban America in War and Peace,” 130. Figures for Boston, 1740–50 and prewar, are from Nash, Urban Crucible, 407–9, while figures for 1760–70 and wartime are from Schultz, supplemented by Price, “American Port Towns,” 176. Figures for Charleston, 1740–70 and prewar, are from Coclanis, Shadow of a Dream, 114, while the wartime figure is from “Report of a Board of General and Field Officers” to Sir Henry Clinton, April 15, 1782, in General Alexander Leslie's Letter Book, Thomas Addis Emmet Collection, New York Public Library. Figures for Newport are from Schultz, “Urban America in War and Peace,” 130, and Crane, Dependent People, 123, 157, supplemented by Price, “American Port Towns.”