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Evangelical vs. LiberalThe Clash of Christian Cultures in the Pacific Northwest$
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James K. Wellman

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195300116

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195300116.001.0001

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 Modernity, Religion, and Moral Worldviews

 Modernity, Religion, and Moral Worldviews

Chapter:
(p.31) 4 Modernity, Religion, and Moral Worldviews
Source:
Evangelical vs. Liberal
Author(s):

James K. Wellman Jr.

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195300116.003.0005

Peter Berger has argued that modernity marginalizes religion to the private sphere, thus creating a secularization of culture. Later he reneged, suggesting that religion can survive without a “sacred canopy.” Christian Smith has used the term “sacred umbrella,” and in this study the metaphor “sacred tent” is used to suggest that subcultures use religion to solidify and mobilize identity. This chapter gives a definition of religion, arguing that groups form religious subcultures around symbolic and social boundaries that involve forces and powers that go beyond the self and group, which create powerful moral worldviews‐defining identity, creating tension with outsiders, and, on occasion, violence.

Keywords:   Peter Berger, Christian Smith, definition of religion, modernity, privatization, sacred canopy, religious subculture, moral worldview, identity, conflict

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