Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
French Opera at the Fin de Siecle$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Steven Huebner

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195189544

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195189544.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 March 2019

Massenet Emasculated

Massenet Emasculated

Chapter:
(p.160) 8 Massenet Emasculated
Source:
French Opera at the Fin de Siecle
Author(s):

Steven Huebner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195189544.003.0009

This chapter focuses on criticisms against Massenet's appeal to women. The reception of Massenet was strongly gendered from Manon on, and critics portrayed audiences as a reflection of the music itself, and vice versa. This typecasting as a specialist in feminine behaviour, with corresponding applications to musical style, has meant that Massenet always faced an uphill battle with critics when it came to larger heroic subjects such as Le Cid, or male characters such as Werther and Don Quichotte. It was in the Wagnerian camp of critics — the Fourcauds, the Ernsts, the Servières — that the invective against Massenet became most virulent: his supposed insincerity, desire for flattery, superficiality, all tainted more or less (depending on the writer and the circumstance) with the brush of femininity.

Keywords:   French opera, criticism, femininity, Wagnerian, Le Cid

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .