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The Master Musicians: Mozart$
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Julian Rushton

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195182644

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182644.001.0001

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Aftermath ‘…de morte transire ad vitam’

Aftermath ‘…de morte transire ad vitam’

Chapter:
(p.232) Chapter 19 Aftermath ‘…de morte transire ad vitam
Source:
The Master Musicians: Mozart
Author(s):

Julian Rushton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182644.003.0019

Mozart was a famous composer in his own lifetime. This simple assertion needs to be made from time to time, as the story is still told of the hopelessly misunderstood genius, dying in poverty and obscurity, whose reputation soared after his death. The last part is true, and in the romantic 19th century it did him no posthumous harm to have died young. Other than in England, where the honor goes to Handel, Mozart was the first composer to remain permanently lodged in the minds not only of practising musicians but also of the musical public. Scholars continue to research Mozart's life, analyse his music, and try to gain insight into his personality, but the 20th-century response to Mozart may best be measured through his rising popularity.

Keywords:   Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, composer, composition

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