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In Order to LearnHow the sequence of topics influences learning$
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Frank E. Ritter, Josef Nerb, Erno Lehtinen, and Timothy O'Shea

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195178845

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195178845.001.0001

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Making Your Own Order: Order Effects in System- and User-Controlled Settings for Learning and Problem Solving

Making Your Own Order: Order Effects in System- and User-Controlled Settings for Learning and Problem Solving

Chapter:
(p.195) Chapter 14 Making Your Own Order: Order Effects in System- and User-Controlled Settings for Learning and Problem Solving
Source:
In Order to Learn
Author(s):

Katharina Scheiter

Peter Gerjets

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195178845.003.0014

This chapter addresses the question of how tasks should be ordered to foster learning and the transfer of knowledge. It first reviews the existing findings on simple-to-complex sequencing and sequencing according to the structural variability of tasks. Second, for the explanation of order effects, it outlines a model that supports deriving testable hypotheses for when and why instructional sequences should vary in performance. Third, it describes the results from two experiments that confirm these hypotheses. Fourth, the model of order effects is applied to user-controlled settings (i.e. those in which the students are allowed to determine the order of the problems). The role of rearranging problems is investigated by means of a questionnaire and an experiment. The chapter ends with a discussion of the instructional implications and some suggestions for future research in this area.

Keywords:   order effects, learning, knowledge transfer, sequencing, instruction sequences

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