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Crossing Confessional BoundariesThe Patronage of Italian Sacred Music in Seventeenth-Century Dresden$
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Mary Frandsen

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195178319

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195178319.001.0001

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Johann Georg’s Vision for Worship

Johann Georg’s Vision for Worship

(p.341) 7 Johann Georg’s Vision for Worship
Crossing Confessional Boundaries

Mary E. Frandsen

Oxford University Press

Virtually upon taking his seat at the Saxon helm, Johann Georg II initiated a program of musico-liturgical reform that would take six years to bring to full fruition, and which would culminate in his Kirchen-Ordnung (“church order”), the codification of both the schedule of feasts and liturgical forms that would remain in use in the chapel until his death in 1680. His program of reform, which was doubtless undertaken in consultation with court preacher Jacob Weller, advanced in three basic stages: the establishment of the number and nature of services to be celebrated on feast days throughout the liturgical year; the musical enhancement of the various liturgies; and finally, the promulgation of his Kirchen-Ordnung and its realization in the chapel liturgies.

Keywords:   Johann Georg II, musico-liturgical reform, Kirchen-Ordnung, liturgical forms

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