Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Causal LearningPsychology, Philosophy, and Computation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alison Gopnik and Laura Schulz

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176803

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176803.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Interactions Between Causal and Statistical Learning

Interactions Between Causal and Statistical Learning

Chapter:
(p.139) 9 Interactions Between Causal and Statistical Learning
Source:
Causal Learning
Author(s):

David M. Sobel

Natasha Z. Kirkham

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176803.003.0010

Infants and young children appear to have powerful statistical learning mechanisms that allow them to acquire predictive information about the environment. Children also appear to possess powerful mechanisms for causal learning, which allow them not only to predict their environment, but to explain, interpret, and intervene. This chapter examines the relation between children's causal learning and inferential abilities, and their ability to recognize statistical regularity. It proposes that while there is more to causal learning than just statistical mechanisms, statistical learning abilities — particularly abilities that infants appear to possess — might help to lay the foundation for a mechanism for causal learning. It describes how the literature on infants' statistical learning has informed what we know about children's causal learning abilities.

Keywords:   causal learning, statistical learning, multimodal integration, children's causal inference

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .