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Brain and Visual PerceptionThe Story of a 25-year Collaboration$
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DAVID H. HUBEL and TORSTEN N. WIESEL

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176186

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176186.001.0001

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The New Department

The New Department

Chapter:
(p.53) Chapter 6 The New Department
Source:
Brain and Visual Perception
Author(s):

David H. Hubel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176186.003.0006

The first-ever Department of Neurobiology was launched in 1966, with Kuffler as the chairman. In the 1960s and 1970s, the main problem between Torsten and David concerned the question of continuing collaboration. Kuffler was puzzled over how to justify two senior appointments to the rest of the faculty, especially two people working in the same field. Around the time the new department was being formed, the dean of the medical school offered David the position as chairman of the Department of Physiology. He accepted because it offered an opportunity to build his own group. Certain awkward aspects of the arrangement soon became evident for his and Torsten's backgrounds were neurology and psychiatry, not physiology. He later recognized that he made a mistake, and resigned the job before doing the Department of Physiology and his research any irreparable harm.

Keywords:   neurobiology, Department of Physiology, chairmanship, psychiatry

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