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Visual ReflectionsA Perceptual Deficit and Its Implications$
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Michael McCloskey

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195168693

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195168693.001.0001

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Visual Updating and Visual Awareness

Visual Updating and Visual Awareness

Chapter:
(p.248) 18 Visual Updating and Visual Awareness
Source:
Visual Reflections
Author(s):

Michael McCloskey

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195168693.003.0018

This chapter presents results concerning AH's head and eye movements and the consequences of these movements for her visual location perception. It shows that AH often moved her head and eyes in the wrong direction when attempting to orient toward a visual stimulus. It then reports a far more surprising result: AH's misperceptions of object location often remained stable across head and eye movements. For this latter result, the chapter offers a speculative interpretation concerning the processes that generate high-level visual location representations. Finally, it discusses the implications of AH's performance for issues concerning the levels of the visual system implicated in conscious visual experience.

Keywords:   visual system, head movement, eye movement, visual location, visual perception, object location

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