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Latino Religions and Civic Activism in the United States$
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Gastón Espinosa, Virgilio Elizondo, and Jesse Miranda

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195162271

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195162271.001.0001

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¡Ya Basta! Latino/a Protestant Activism in the Chicano/a and Farm Workers Movements

¡Ya Basta! Latino/a Protestant Activism in the Chicano/a and Farm Workers Movements

Chapter:
(p.127) 8 ¡Ya Basta! Latino/a Protestant Activism in the Chicano/a and Farm Workers Movements
Source:
Latino Religions and Civic Activism in the United States
Author(s):

Paul Barton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195162271.003.0009

This chapter examines the responses of los Protestantes in the US Southwest to the Chicano/a and farm worker movements, illuminating their role in the public arena during the last thirty-five years. The primary goals are: firstly, to highlight the catalytic ability of a cadre of Chicano/a “mainline” Protestant leaders to move their churches and ecclesial organizations to endorse and support the Chicano/a and farm worker movements in Texas from the 1960s until the early 1980s; and secondly, to examine the three basic responses of Latino/a Protestants to these social justice movements (solidarity, ambivalence and indifference, and opposition). As the Chicano/a Protestants led their church co-faithful into the public struggle of these popular movements, they caused a realignment of loyalties among a number of “mainline” Latino/a Protestants. Ethnic affiliation became as important to them as their denominational affiliation. Additionally, they promoted a theological understanding of the Gospel that embraced the oppressed and viewed the kingdom of God as a goal to strive for in contemporary society.

Keywords:   Mexican American Protestants, farm worker movements, social movements, Southwest

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