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The Apocalyptic Year 1000Religious Expectation and Social Change, 950-1050$
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Richard Landes, Andrew Gow, and David C. Van Meter

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780195161625

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161625.001.0001

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Waiting for the Millennium

Waiting for the Millennium

Chapter:
(p.121) 6 Waiting for the Millennium
Source:
The Apocalyptic Year 1000
Author(s):

Umberto Eco

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161625.003.0007

This chapter analyzes why in the 8th century a Spanish monk set out to write a mammoth commentary on a few pages of St. John's Book of Revelation, making it more obscure and ambiguous than it originally was, and why this salmagundi from different sources had an unprecedented success. The 1970s were in Europe the years in which the political springtime of 1968, after a short and very hot summer, entered an ambiguous fall in which the first terrorist movements started to show up, from the Bader Meinhof group in Germany to the Red Brigades in Italy. The original leaders of the Red Brigades did not come originally from a Marxist background but were on the contrary born Catholic. This chapter shares, in passing, some of the book's historical reflections, which are perhaps also introspections.

Keywords:   monk, commentary, St. John, Book of Revelation, Bader Meinhof, Germany, Red Brigades, Italy, introspections

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