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One Nation, UninsuredWhy the U.S. Has No National Health Insurance$
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Jill Quadagno

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195160390

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195160390.001.0001

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The Insurers Triumphant

The Insurers Triumphant

Chapter:
(p.169) seven The Insurers Triumphant
Source:
One Nation, Uninsured
Author(s):

Jill Quadagno

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195160390.003.0008

This chapter demonstrates how the coalition of insurance companies, managed-care firms, and small businesses destroyed a proposal for home care for disabled people in the 1980s, and notes that the same coalition also attacked President Clinton's plan for universal health care in the 1990s. It begins by discussing long-term care for the weak elderly, then looks at another revival of the national health insurance and introduces the Consolidated Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1985, which tried to fill the gaps within the private health insurance system. The chapter then studies health policy making after the Health Security failed.

Keywords:   home care, disabled people, universal health care, long-term care, weak elderly, Consolidated Omnibus Reconciliation, private health insurance, health policy making, Health Security

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