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The Tale of the ScaleAn Odyssey of Invention$
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Solly Angel

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195158687

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195158687.001.0001

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The Tale of the Scale
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Solly Angel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195158687.003.0005

Solly Angel arrived in New York City at the beginning of September 1987, rented a car, and drove north to New England to meet Harry Jones, Consulting Engineer. When he arrived in New England, Harry was behind schedule, and the prototype was far from ready. What he did have—a quarter-inch-thick piece of the legendary Lexan with the contemplated cutouts—was not nearly strong enough under load. He mumbled something about the fibers not being lined up as the reason the Lexan plate was weak. But Angel believed that there was no way that a poor plate was going to be strong enough no matter how the fibers lined up. Most worrisome of all, the Lexan, being a plastic after all, was clearly outside its elastic range when loaded with 100 pounds or more, taking its own sweet time to return to its original shape once the load was removed. The journey with Harry led in an important conclusion—the thin plate, the thin load cells, and the thin electronic circuits were, after all, three separable parts.

Keywords:   Harry Jones, New England, Lexan plate, thin plate, thin load cell, thin electronic circuit, Solly Angel

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