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Nature, Nurture, and the Transition to Early
                        Adolescence$
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Stephen A. Petrill, Robert Plomin, John C. DeFries, and John K. Hewitt

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780195157475

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195157475.001.0001

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Effects of Prenatal Smoking on 12-Year-Old Children’s Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes

Effects of Prenatal Smoking on 12-Year-Old Children’s Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes

Chapter:
(p.222) 14 Effects of Prenatal Smoking on 12-Year-Old Children’s Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes
Source:
Nature, Nurture, and the Transition to Early Adolescence
Author(s):

Michelle Ward

Laura A. Baker

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195157475.003.0014

This chapter explores the effect of prenatal smoking on cognitive and behavioral outcomes in children. These effects are examined in both adopted and non-adopted children in order to evaluate the extent to which smoking during pregnancy may affect general and specific cognitive abilities, personality characteristics, and childhood behavioral problems at twelve years of age. A comparison of effects between adopted children (separated from their birth mothers shortly after birth) and non-adopted children (raised by their birth mothers) is made, along with an investigation of characteristics of mothers who did and did not smoke during pregnancy. The chapter also examines the extent to which maternal characteristics (such as education and cognitive ability) may explain any adverse child outcomes in the smoking groups.

Keywords:   prenatal smoking, adopted children, non-adopted children, cognitive ability, behavioral problems, personality, pregnancy, education

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