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Cognitive Neuroscience of AgingLinking cognitive and cerebral aging$
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Roberto Cabeza, Lars Nyberg, and Denise Park

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195156744

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156744.001.0001

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Functional Connectivity During Memory Tasks in Healthy Aging and Dementia

Functional Connectivity During Memory Tasks in Healthy Aging and Dementia

Chapter:
(p.286) 12 Functional Connectivity During Memory Tasks in Healthy Aging and Dementia
Source:
Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging
Author(s):

Cheryl L. Grady

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156744.003.0012

This chapter reviews functional neuroimaging studies of memory in young adults, older adults, and patients with dementia that have used the traditional univariate subtraction approach. It shows how examination of functional connectivity can be useful in identifying between-group differences not possible with univariate approaches. It focuses on changes involving prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus because these areas are thought by some to be particularly vulnerable to aging, and much of the neuroimaging literature on memory has focused on these regions.

Keywords:   functional neuroimaging dementia, memory, univariate subtraction approach, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, aging, young adults, older adults

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