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The Development of Modern Logic$
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Leila Haaparanta

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195137316

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195137316.001.0001

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The Relations between Logic and Philosophy, 1874–1931

The Relations between Logic and Philosophy, 1874–1931

Chapter:
(p.222) 7 The Relations between Logic and Philosophy, 1874–1931
Source:
The Development of Modern Logic
Author(s):

Leila Haaparanta (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195137316.003.0025

This chapter gives a survey of the field of philosophy where (1) the philosophical foundations of modern logic were discussed and (2) where such themes of logic were discussed that were on the borderline between logic and other branches of the philosophical enterprise, such as metaphysics and epistemology. The contributions made by Gottlob Frege and Charles Peirce are included since their work in logic is closely related to and also strongly motivated by their philosophical views and interests. In addition, the chapter pays attention to a few philosophers to whom logic amounted to traditional Aristotelian logic and to those who commented on the nature of logic from a philosophical perspective without making any significant contribution to the development of formal logic.

Keywords:   philosophy, logic, Gottlob Frege, Charles Peirce, metaphysics, epidemiology, psychology

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