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The Green TigerThe Costs of Ecological Decline in the Philippines$
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Barbara Goldoftas

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195135114

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195135114.001.0001

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Nameless Solidarity: Quedan Kaisahan

Nameless Solidarity: Quedan Kaisahan

Chapter:
(p.157) 8 Nameless Solidarity: Quedan Kaisahan
Source:
The Green Tiger
Author(s):

Barbara Goldoftas

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195135114.003.0008

This chapter analyzes the broad repercussions of the concentration of land ownership in the Philippines: on the path that development has taken, on the misuse of natural resources, and on the social and political unrest. It relates the case of a single land-tenure conflict on the island of Negros Occidental, where vast sugar plantations have, over generations, enriched the sugar growers while most of the population remained landless and impoverished. Under the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program, enacted under Corazon Aquino, the Department of Agrarian Reform was not able to accomplish broad land redistribution, and the program motivated some landowners to stop investing in their land. The chapter also illustrates the difficulty of life in a poor province like Negros, and the complexity of the land-reform process.

Keywords:   land ownership, Negros Occidental, sugar plantations, Agrarian Reform Program, Corazon Aquino

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