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Principles of Frontal Lobe Function$
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Donald T. Stuss and Robert T. Knight

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195134971

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134971.001.0001

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Neurochemical Modulation of Prefrontal Cortical Function in Humans and Animals

Neurochemical Modulation of Prefrontal Cortical Function in Humans and Animals

Chapter:
(p.51) 4 Neurochemical Modulation of Prefrontal Cortical Function in Humans and Animals
Source:
Principles of Frontal Lobe Function
Author(s):

Amy F.T. Arnsten

Trevor W. Robbins

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134971.003.0004

The cognitive functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which include use of working memory to guide behavioral responses and the contents of attentional focus, the inhibition of inappropriate responses, and planning for the future, are among the most fragile in the behavioral repertoire. Deficits in PFC function are evident in every neuropsychiatric disorder. The abilities carried out by the PFC can also become impaired in so-called “normal” individuals under conditions of uncontrollable stress, fatigue, and with advancing age. This chapter reviews research from both animal and human studies on the ways in which dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5HT), and acetylcholine (ACh) may modulate PFC cognitive functions.

Keywords:   prefrontal cortex, cognitive function, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, acetylcholine

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