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Principles of Frontal Lobe Function$
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Donald T. Stuss and Robert T. Knight

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195134971

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134971.001.0001

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The Human Frontal Lobes: Transcending the Default Mode through Contingent Encoding

The Human Frontal Lobes: Transcending the Default Mode through Contingent Encoding

Chapter:
(p.8) 2 The Human Frontal Lobes: Transcending the Default Mode through Contingent Encoding
Source:
Principles of Frontal Lobe Function
Author(s):

M.-Marsel Mesulam

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134971.003.0002

This chapter sets the stage for the rest of the book, presenting anatomical and clinical distinctions that serve as organizational and memory “hooks” for reading many of the other chapters. It discusses how massive damage to the frontal lobes can cause dramatic changes in personality and comportment while keeping sensation, movement, consciousness, and most cognitive faculties. It addresses questions such as: Is there a unitary “frontal lobe syndrome” encompassing all signs and symptoms? Are there regional segregations of function within the frontal lobes? Is it possible to identify a potentially unifying principle of organization which cuts across the heterogeneous specializations attributed to the frontal lobes?

Keywords:   Phineas Gage, frontal lobes, prefrontal cortex, damage, personality

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