Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Studies in Contemporary Jewry an Annual XV 1999$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ezra Mendelsohn

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780195134681

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134681.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 16 October 2018

Jeffrey Rubin-Dorsky and Shelley Fisher Fishkin (eds.), People of the Book: Thirty Scholars Reflect on Their Jewish Identity. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1996. x + 507 pp.

Jeffrey Rubin-Dorsky and Shelley Fisher Fishkin (eds.), People of the Book: Thirty Scholars Reflect on Their Jewish Identity. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1996. x + 507 pp.

Chapter:
Jeffrey Rubin-Dorsky and Shelley Fisher Fishkin (eds.), People of the Book: Thirty Scholars Reflect on Their Jewish Identity. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1996. x + 507 pp.
Source:
Studies in Contemporary Jewry an Annual XV 1999
Author(s):

Milton Shain

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134681.003.0038

A review of the book, People of the Book: Thirty Scholars Reflect on Their Jewish Identity by Jeffrey Rubin–Dorsky and Shelley Fisher Fishkin (eds.) is presented. Introducing this enterprising and creative collection, the editors ask “whether the commitment and creativity that has enabled the Jewish people to survive for five thousand years may be reconfigured anew at the end of the 20th century.” Their question relates to those doomsday prophecies that see acculturation and assimilation delivering a death blow to Jewish “peoplehood.” At issue here is the very meaning of “Jewishness.” Is it, as some claim, a question of faith and observance — or can the net of Jewishness be cast wider to incorporate other meaningful modes of Jewish identity? The editors firmly believe that the latter is possible, at least in America. Paradigms of Jewishness can be reconfigured; identity is “something one does, not something one has”.

Keywords:   faith, Jewishness, Jewish identity

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .