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Genetics and Public Health in the 21st CenturyUsing Genetic Information to Improve Health and Prevent Disease$
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Muin J. Khoury, Wylie Burke, and Elizabeth Thomson

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780195128307

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195128307.001.0001

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Public health assessment of genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases: malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV

Public health assessment of genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases: malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV

Chapter:
(p.173) 10 Public health assessment of genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases: malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV
Source:
Genetics and Public Health in the 21st Century
Author(s):

Janet M McNicholl

Marie V. Downer

Michael Aidoo

Thomas Hodge

Venkatachalam Udhayakumar

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195128307.003.0010

The understanding of the host genetic factors that influence susceptibility to and the course of infectious diseases is growing rapidly. Even for the most common pathogens, however, there is an incomplete understanding of all the important genes. As sequencing of the more than 100,000 human genes continues and as technologies advance, new discoveries about host genes and their role in infectious diseases are made almost daily. Translating this knowledge into public health actions, particularly those aimed at combating and controlling infectious diseases, is a major challenge. This chapter focuses on this downstream phase of genetics, particularly on how new knowledge can be integrated into existing public health programs and strategies.

Keywords:   public health, genetic factors, infectious disease, genetics, disease prevention, malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS

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