Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Music, Language, and the Brain$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Aniruddh D. Patel

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195123753

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195123753.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 September 2018

Syntax

Syntax

Chapter:
(p.239) (p.240) 5 Syntax
Source:
Music, Language, and the Brain
Author(s):

Aniruddh D. Patel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195123753.003.0005

Research by Leonard Bernstein published as The Unanswered Question in 1976 was embraced since it incorporated Noam Chomsky's ideas regarding generative linguistic theory with musical meaning and structure. Although this may have received negative criticisms, this work played no small part in linguist Ray Jackendoff and musicologist Fred Lerdahl's skeptical book A Generative Theory of Tonal Music, which discusses various structural relations perceived by a listener of music. Although comparative studies regarding musical and linguistic syntax may have brought about bouts of both skepticism and enthusiasm, this chapter attempts to 1) discuss musical syntax's background, 2) explain the similarities and differences evident between linguistic and musical syntax and 3) present neuroscientific findings on the linguistic-musical syntactic relations occurring within the brain.

Keywords:   Leonard Bernstein, Noam Chomsky, generative linguistic theory, musical structure, musical meaning, structural relations, musical syntax, linguistic syntax

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .