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Close ListeningPoetry and the Performed Word$
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Charles Bernstein

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780195109924

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195109924.001.0001

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Speech Effects

Speech Effects

The Talk as a Genre

Chapter:
(p.200) 9 Speech Effects
Source:
Close Listening
Author(s):

Bob Perelman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195109924.003.0010

Talk is the most mixed of media, from social to conflictual identificatory, but the tone and rhythm of culturally perspicacious speech make for an effective token of the possibility of individual agency. Talk, as a form for criticism, would seem sketchier than an essay but the form of the talk contains possibilities that are not explored elsewhere by the ranges of language-writing practice. Talk is made out of speech and its amorphous territory is bounded by poetry readings, performance art, teaching and other academic procedures, interviews, and entertainment. Its form is multiplex, existing as both performance and transcription. It can focus around one speaker, a few, or a group and it can be an act of criticism or an art performance.

Keywords:   mixed of media, conflictual identificatory, culturally perspicacious speech, talk, form for criticism, amorphous territory

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