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Lorenz HartA Poet on Broadway$
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Frederick Nolan

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780195102895

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195102895.001.0001

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A Willing Ham for Dillingbam

A Willing Ham for Dillingbam

Chapter:
(p.110) 15 A Willing Ham for Dillingbam
Source:
Lorenz Hart
Author(s):

Frederick Nolan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195102895.003.0015

All through this period, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart were hard at work on the Dillingham show, She's My Baby, which had begun rehearsals November 7th and had tryouts of a week each in Washington, Baltimore, and Newark. As well as Bea Lillie, the producer had lined up the debonair Clifton Webb, who'd made a mark as far back as 1916 in Cole Porter's Broadway bow, See America First, then graduated to featured roles in As You Were with Irene Bordoni and Sunny with Marilyn Miller. More recently he had won plaudits as an adagio dancer partnering Mary Hay at the Palace and at Giro's nightclub. The ingenue and juvenile were Irene Dunne and smiling, red-haired Jack Whiting, the poor man's Fred Astaire. To their dismay, Rodgers and Hart discovered that Charles Dillingham had lost interest in the show.

Keywords:   Dick Rodgers, Larry Hart, Dillingham show, Bea Lillie, Clifton Webb, Irene Bordoni, Marilyn Miller, Charles Dillingham

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