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Lorenz HartA Poet on Broadway$
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Frederick Nolan

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780195102895

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195102895.001.0001

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More Gaieties

More Gaieties

Chapter:
(p.77) 11 More Gaieties
Source:
Lorenz Hart
Author(s):

Frederick Nolan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195102895.003.0011

Although it meant working for the first time away from Herbert Fields, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart accepted a new commission and made arrangements to go to London as soon as they were finished with a new edition of The Garrick Gaieties. Larry and Dick had been reluctant to do a follow-up, because the element of spontaneity and youthful insouciance the first show had traded on would be missing. However, Terry Helburn and Lawrence Langner of the Theatre Guild won them over by pointing out that revenues, from the Ziegfeld Follies on down, were doing big business, and by promising them star billing, Hard and Rodgers argued no more: star billing at the Theatre Guild was very attractive. Working with many of the same talented young people — Edith Meiser, Romney Brent, Philip Loeb, Hildegarde Halliday, Betty Starbuck, Sterling Holloway — they set out once more to kid the theatrical profession in general and the Theatre Guild in particular.

Keywords:   Herbert Fields, Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart, The Garrick Gaieties, Terry Helburn, Lawrence Langner, Theatre Guild, Edith Meiser, Romney Brent, Philip Loeb

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