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Contesting CastroThe United States and the Triumph of the Cuban Revolution$
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Thomas G. Paterson

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780195101201

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195101201.001.0001

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Taking Sides: Arms, Arrests, and Elections

Taking Sides: Arms, Arrests, and Elections

Chapter:
(p.109) 10 Taking Sides: Arms, Arrests, and Elections
Source:
Contesting Castro
Author(s):

Thomas G. Paterson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195101201.003.0011

One week after the meeting with Joaquin Meyer, the Office of Middle American Affairs issued a memorandum to Assistant Secretary Rubottom. The office, using data from the U.S. Embassy in Havana and the consulate in Santiago, and consulting with Cuban desk officer, Terrance G. Leonhardy, coordinated with the policy. William Wieland led this unit of the State Department. Wieland worked there in the early 1930s as a newspaper correspondent and he could speak Spanish. Like other Latin American specialists in the State Department, Wieland had served many positions in the Western part—Rio de Janeiro, Bogota, San Salvador, and Quito—before settling in Washington. He also became the director of the office on May 19, 1957, and the Cuban crisis soon became his agenda.

Keywords:   Joaquin Meyer, Office of Middle American Affairs, memorandum, Terrance G. Leonhardy, William Wieland

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