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The Gettysburg Lectures$
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Gabor S. Boritt

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780195089110

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195089110.001.0001

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War Opponent and War President

War Opponent and War President

Chapter:
(p.179) 7 War Opponent and War President
Source:
The Gettysburg Lectures
Author(s):

Gabor S. Boritt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195089110.003.0007

This chapter explores Lincoln's childhood years and his growing aberration to war. The War of 1812 coincided with Lincoln's early childhood. Patriotic and pro-war sentiments surrounded his youth. Hunting was a way of life and the means of survival on the frontier, which Lincoln admits he did not do much of. Striking evidences suggest that Lincoln harbored anti-military and anti-violence sentiments in the midst of a nation which was prized in military glory. His faith in liberty, combined with political self-interest and abomination of violence, could explain his pacifist approach to the impending civil war in America. Whether or not a nation deserved such a president or his love of peace and dislike of war is a matter for conjecture.

Keywords:   childhood, War of 1812, war president, just war, anti-war, civil violence, military glory, Lincoln

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