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Neither Black Nor White Yet BothThematic Explorations of Interracial Literature$

Werner Sollors

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780195052824

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195052824.001.0001

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(p.360) (p.361) Appendix A A Chronology of Interracial Literature

(p.360) (p.361) Appendix A A Chronology of Interracial Literature

Source:
Neither Black Nor White Yet Both
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

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5th century B.C?

Cleobulus. Riddle.

A.D. 2nd century

Calpurnius Flaccus. “Natus Æthiopus.”

A.D. 3rd/4th century

Heliodorus. Æthiopica.

ca. 900

The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night emerges (present form ca. 16th/17th c.): esp. “The Story of King Sharyar and His Brother,” “The Story of the Eunuch Buhkayt,” “The Man of Al Yemen and His Six Slave Girls,” and “The Story of the Ensorcelled Prince.”

1197–1210

Wolfram von Eschenbach. Parzival. Trans. Jessie Weston (episode of Gachmuret, Belakane and their son Feirefiz, esp. in book I).

1212–18

Wolfram von Eschenbach. Willehalm.

1475

Masuccio Salernitano. Il Novellino. Esp. XXII (story of wife who runs away to Africa with her slave), XXIV (deceived lover), XXV (Geronima).

1566

Giovanbattista Giraldi Cinthio. Heccatommithi. Venezia (seventh novella of third decade is source of Othello).

1578

George Best. “A true discourse on the three Voyages of Discovery, for the finding of a passage to Cathay,” in Hakluyt’s Voyages.

1595

First British use of word “Mulatto” cited in Oxford English Dictionary.

1558–1612

François Beroalde de Verville. “Le Moyen de Parvenir.”

1604

William Shakespeare. Othello (performed in 1605, published in 1622).

1605

Garcilaso de la Vega. Historia de la Florida.

1608

Antonio Marin Ocete. Antigüedad y excelencias de Granada (with remarks on Juan Latino).

1614

Marino. “Black you are, but beautiful, o pretty monster…” (sonnet).

1613

Lope de Vega. La Dama Boba (finished in ms. 28 April; with scene about Juan Latino).

1633

George Herbert (1583–1633). “The Blackamoor and Her Loves” (poem).

1646

Thomas Browne. “Of the Blackness of Negroes.” Chapter X of Pseudodoxia.

1652

Don Diego Ximénez de Enciso. Comedia famosa de Juan Latino. Ed. Eduardo Julía Martínez.

1657

Richard Ligon. A True and Exact History of the Island of Barbados (a source of “Inkle and Yarico”).

1657

Christopher Marlowe. Lust’s Dominion; or, The Lascivious Queen.

1657

Eldred Revett. “The fair Nymph scorning a black Boy courting her,” “The inversion,” “One Enamour’d on a Black-moor,” and “A black Nymph scorning a fair Boy Courting her.” In Select Poems: Humane and Divine, ed. Donald M. Friedman.

1658

John Cleveland. “A Faire Nimph scorning a Black Boy Courting her.” In The Poems of John Cleveland, ed. Brian Morris and Eleanor Withington.

1665

Edward Lord Herbert of Cherbury. “The Brown Beauty,” “Sonnet of Black Beauty,” “To Mistress Diana Cecil,” and “Another Sonnet to Black it self.” In The Poems of Herbert of Cherbury, ed. G. C. Moore Smith.

1668

Henry Neville. The Isle of Pines. Reprinted in Shorter Novels: Seventeenth Century, ed. Philip Henderson.

1678

A.O. Exquemelin [Hendrik Barentzoon Smeeks]. De Americaensche Zee-Roovers Behelsende een Pertinent. Verhaelvan alle de Roverye En Ommenselÿcke Vreetheeden die de Engelsche en Frame Roovers Tegens de Spanyaerden in America Gepleeght Hebben. Amsterdam: Jan ten Hoorn (English translation: John Esquemeling, The Buccaneers of America).

1688

Aphra Behn. Oroonoko: The History of the Royal Slave.

1692

Use of “Malatta” in Samuel Sewal’s diary (10 October).

1696

Thomas Southern. Oroonoko; A Tragedy in Five Acts. Cited from ed. with intro. by Mrs. Inchbald (Imoinda has become white).

1698

William Walker. Victorious Love (tragedy published by the 19–year-old son of a wealthy Barbadoes planter and produced at Drury Lane in June).

1698

William Walsh. Oroonoko.

1700

Samuel Sewall. The Selling of Joseph (special condemnation for those who wanted to “connive at the Fornication of their Slaves”).

1702

Report in Académie royale.

1711

Richard Steele. “Inkle and Yarico” (Spectator, 13 March). (Yarico is Indian in this original; became black in some versions of the cult that followed; trans. German 1713, French 1714, Swedish 1734, Danish 1742, Russian 1759).

1720

W. P. The Jamaica Lady. Reprinted in Four Before Richardson: Selected English Novels, 1720–1727, ed. William H. McBurney (picaresque erotic novel contains interesting story of Holmesia and her exploits).

1722

Jean-Baptiste Labat. Nouveau voyage aux isles de l’Amérique, contenant l’histoire naturelle de ces pays, l’origine, les moeurs, la religion & le gouvernement, des habitans anciens & modernes, les guerres & les evenements singuliers qui y sont arrivéz pendant le sejour que l’auteur y a fait.

1728

William Pattison. “Yarico to Inkle, an Epistle.”

1732

“The Cameleon Lover.” Poem in Charleston Gazette, 11 March.

1732

John Whaley. “To a Gentleman in Love with a Negro Woman” and “On a Young Lady Weeping at Oroonoko.”

1734

Anon. “The Story of Inkle and Yarico. From the 11th Spectator.” London Magazine; or, Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer III (May 1734): 257–58 (earliest poetic version makes Yarico a Negro virgin).

1740

Madame de * * * [Villeneuve; Gabrielle Suzanne Barbot]. La Jeune Américaine et les contes marins (first version of “La Belle et la Bête”).

1740

Padre Joseph Gumilla. El Orinoco ilustrado, y defendido, historia natural, civil, y geographica de este gran rio, y des sus caudalosas vertientes…(de Pauw cites vol. II, 147–48; Alvar: use of ochavón).

1743–47

Thomas Astley. A New General Collection of Voyages and Travels, 4 vols.

1745

Antoine de Laplace. Translation of Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko (1688).

1746

Christian Fürchtegott Gellert. “Inkle und Yariko.” In Fabeln und Erzählungen.

1749

Don Jorge Juan and Don Antonio de Ulloa. Noticias secretas de America (partly trans. Discourse and Political Reflections on the kingdoms of Peru, 1978). Voyage au Pérou (de Pauw cites tome I, liv. v, ch. 5, p. 228).

1753

Stephen Duck, Avaro to Amanda (Inkle/Yarico version).

1755

[Diderot et al.]. Encyclopédic; ou, Dictionnaire Raisonné. Vol.5 (Esclave).

1757

Madame Leprince de Beaumont, “La Belle et la Bête” (new, shorter version of Villeneuve’s tale of 1740).

1764

G. Mailhol. Le Philosophe nègre.

1765

[Diderot et al.]. Encyclopédic; ou, Dictionnuire Raisonné. Vol. 11 (“Esclave,” “Nègre,” “Nègres” with “Code noir”).

1767

Edward Jerningham. Yarico to Inkle, an Epistle.

1770

C[ornelius] de P[auw], Recherches philosophiques sur les américains; ou, Mémoires interessants pour servir à l’histoire de l’espéce humaine. 2 vols.

1773

Thomas Day and John Bicknell. “The Dying Negro” (black slave in love with a white woman).

1774

[Edward Long]. The History of Jamaica; Or, General Survey of the Ancient and Modern State of the Island: With Reflections on Its Situation, Settlements, Inhabitants, Climate, Products, Commerce, Laws, and Government. 3 vols.

1775

Ernst Lorenz Michael Rathelf. Die Mohrinn zu Hamburg (play; a variation on Gellert’s “Die beiden Schwarzen”?).

1776

Buffon, De l’homme;, esp. Suppléments á l’article “Mulets.”

1777

Buffon, Additions to Varietés dans l’espèce humaine.

1778

James de la Cour. “In Laudem Æthiopissae.”

1779

Carl Franz Guolfinger. Die Negersklaven (play).

1780

Pierre Louis Moreau de Maupertuis, La Vénus physique.

1782–86

Karl August Musäus. “Melechsala.” In Volksmärchen der Deutscben.

1785

Immmanuel Kant. “Bestimmung des Begriffs einer Menschenrace.” In Gesammelte Schriften, Akademie-Ausgabe, VIII.

1787

Adventures of Jonathan Corncob, Loyal American Refugee. Written by Himself, esp. ch. 13, “The West-Indian way of whitewashing, or rather the true way of washing the blackamoor white. Jonathan begins to lose his good opinion of Barbadoes.”

1787

[Jean-Baptiste] Radet, and [Pierre-Yon] Barré. La Nègresse; ou, Le Pouvoir de la reconnaissance (“The Negress, or the Power of Recognition”). Paris: Brunet.

1787

Bernardin de Saint-Pierre. Paul et Virginie (no mixed couple, but very influential on exoticism).

1788

Hannah More. “The Slave Trade.”

1789

J. Lavallée. Le Nègre comme il y a peu de Blancs.

1789

Lecointe-Marsillac. Le More-Lack.

1790

Baron de Wimpffen. St.-Domingue.

1791

C[harles] W[ilson] Peale. “ACCOUNT of a Person born a NEGRO, or a very DARK MULATTOE, who afterwards became WHITE.” Universal Asylum arid Columbian Magazine 7.6 (Dec.): 409–10 (the Henry Moss case).

1792

Hugh Henry Brackenridge. Modern Chivalry: Containing the Adventures of Captain John Farrago, and Teague O’Regan, His Servant. Vol. II (ridicules interest in Moss).

1795

Charles-Antoine Guillaume Pigault-Lebrun. Le Blanc et le noir.

1796

Jacques Grasset de Saint Sauveur. Hortense; ou, La Jolie courtisane. Sa vie libertine, à Paris, et ses aventures tragiques avec le nègre Zéphire dans les déserts de l’Amérique.

1796

August von Kotzebue. Die Negersklaven (The Negro Slaves).

1796

[Henry Moss]. “A Great Curiosity.” In Benjamin Rush, “Commonplace Book,” broadside pasted in with entry for 27 July.

1796

Captain John Stedman. Narrative of a Five Years Expedition against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam, in Guiana, on the Wild Coast of South America, from the year 1772 to 1777: elucidating the History of that Country, and describing its Productions, viz. Quadrupeds, Birds, Fishes, Reptiles, Trees, Shrubs, Fruits and Roots; with an Account of the Indians of Guiana and Negroes of Guinea. Transcribed from 1790 manuscript, ed. Richard and Sally Price (see also Child 1834 for the “Joanna” narrative).

1797

M.[édéric] L.[ouis] É.[lie] Moreau de Saint-Méry. Déscription topographique, physique, civile, politique et historique de a partie française de l’isle Saint-Domingue. 2 vols.

1797

J. B. Picquenard. Adonis, anecdote coloniale (rapes and sadism in Haitian Revolution).

1789

J. B. Picquenard. Adonis; ou, Le Bon nègre.

1800

J. B. Picquenard. Zoflora; ou, La Bonne negresse.

1801

Maria Edgeworth. Belinda (Juba subplot).

1803

La Mulâtre conime il y a beaucoup de Blanches, ouvrage pouvant faire suite au Nègre comme il a peu de Blancs. 2 vols.

1804

Franz Kratter. Die Sclavin in Surinam.

1806

Ch. de Cornillon. Odes, suivies d’une lettre sur l’esclavage des Nègres (contains an ode to a quadroon woman Angelique by this proslavery poet).

1806

Thomas Moore. Odes and Epistles (incl. poem “To Thomas Hume, Esq. M. D.”).

1808

[Miss (Mary?) Hassal]. Secret History; or, The Horrors of St. Domingo in a Series of Letters, Written by a Lady at Cape François, to Colonel Burr (as titles promise, and with strong focus on erotic and violent occurrences: e.g., 18–19, 145–53, 169–72).

1810 ff

Johann Friedrich Ernst Albreecht. Scenen der Liebe aus Amerikas heiβen Zonen.

1810

Maria Edgeworth. Belinda (revised ed. in Tales and Novels); sec also her letter to Mrs. Barbaud of 1810 (the Juba intermarriage subplot suppressed at the advice of author’s father).

1811

Heinrich von Kleist. Die Verlobung in St. Domingo.

1812

Theodor Körner. Toni: Ein Drama in. drei Aufzügen (Gilman; a dramatization of Kleist 1811).

1814

William D[i]mond, Esq. The Ethiop. Composed for the Piano Forte by R. Taylor.

1815

Thomas Jefferson. Letter to Francis Gray (4 March).

1819

Charles de Rémuzat. L’Insurrection de Saint-Domingue (L’ Habitation de Saint-Domingue), 5–act drama.

1820

Victor Hugo. Bug-Jargal (text written in 1818; first version).

1821

James Madison. “Jonathan Bull and Mary Bull: An Inedited Manuscript.” Printed for Presentation by J. (C M’Guire. (“Written but not published at the period of the Missouri question, 1821.”)

1822

Mœurs des trois couleurs aux Antilles.

1822

Horace de Saint-Aubin [Honoré de Balzac]. Le Nègre: mélodrame en. trois actes (unpublished ms., rejected by Théâtre de la Gaîté; published in 1930).

1824

Mme. [Claire de Kersaint] la duchesse de [Durfort-] Duras. Ourika (English trans, by [George Wallis Haven]).

1824

Mélesville [Anne Honoré Joseph de Duveyrier] and [Pierre Frédéric (or Frédéric?) Adolphe] Carmouche, Ourika; ou, La Petite Nègresse. Drame en un acte, mêlée des couplets.

1824

Mme. Adéle Huvey Daminois. Lydie; ou, La Créole. 4 vols. Leterrier.

1824

Mme. Augustine Dudon. La Nouvelle Ourika; ou, Les Avantages se l’éducation (about the natural child of a quarteronne.)

1824

J. T. Merle and F. de Courcy. Ourika; ou, L’Orpheline africaine.

1824

Victor Vignon Rétif de la Bretonne. Og (parody of Ourika).

1825

Gaspard de Pons. “Ourika l’Africaine.” Inspirations poétiques, reprinted in Adieux poétiques, vol. 2, pp. 41–46.

1825

Ulric Guttinger. Ourika.

1825

François Gérard. Ourika (a painting).

1826

François-René de Chateaubriand. Les Natchez.

1826

James Fenimore Cooper. The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757.

1826

Ignaz Franz Castelli. Urika, die Negerinn. In Dramatisches Sträuβchen 11:133–78.

1826

Mme. Ballent and J. Quantin. La Ne’gresse (Ourika-inspired).

1826

Victor Hugo. Bug-Jargal. Both versions reprinted in Bug Jargal; ou, La Révolution haïtienne, ed. Roger Toumson.

1826

Christopher E. Lefroy, ed. Outalissi: A Tale of Dutch Guiana (Ourika influenced).

1827/28

Aleksandr Sergeevič Puškin. Arap Petra Velikogo (“The Blackamoor of Peter the Great”).

1829

Prosper Mérimée. Tamango.

1829

David Walker. Appeal.

1830/31

Édouard Corbière. “Petite histoire d’un Mulâtre en France.” Le Navigateur, 28–35.

1832

Charles Castellan. “La Mulâtresse.” Les Palmiers, 137–38.

1832

Edouard Corbière. “Le Bamboula.” Le Cabinet de lecture, 4 Sept.

1833

[Charles James Cannon], Oran the Outcast; or, A Season in New York.

1833

Victor Charlier and Eugène Chapus. “Le Dernier des Tarquins,” “L’Épave,” “Jean-Pol,” “M. de Cluvigny.” In Titime, histoires de l’autre monde.

1834

Lydia Maria Child. “Joanna.” In The Oasis (story of slave woman Joanna, derived from Stedman 1796), 65–105.

1834

Édouard Corbière. “Le Mariage blanc et noir.” Le Cabinet de lecture, 14 July.

1834

Edouard Corbière. Le Négrier, aventures de mer.

1834

David M. Reese. A Brief Review of the First Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society (pamphlet).

1834

David Ruggles. The “Extinguisher” Extinguished! or David M. Reese, M.D. “Used Up” (pamphlet).

1834

Antony Thouret. Toussaint le Mulâtre.

1835

Gustave de Beaumont. Marie; ou, L’Esclavage aux Etats-Unis, tableau de mœurs américaines. Transl, and ed. Barbara Chapman, Marie; or, Slavery in the United States.

1835

Oliver Bolokitten [Jerome B. Holgate]. A Sojourn in the City of Amalgamation in the Year of Our Lord, 19———.

1835

Louis de Maynard de Queilhe. Outre-mer.

1835

Alexis de Tocqueville. Democracy in America, esp. vol. I, ch. xviii.

1836

John Quincy Adams. “The Character of Desdemona.” American Monthly Magazine 1: 209–17.

1836

[Richard Hildreth]. The Slave; or, Memoirs of Archy Moore.

1837

Alfred Maillant et Legoyt. L’Esclave Andréa, drama in 5 acts.

1837

Victor Séjour. “Moeurs coloniales: le Mulâtre.” Revue des Colonies (March 1837): 376–92; reprinted with introduction by David O’Connell, Revue de Louisiane 1.2 (Winter 1972): 60–75 (see 1858).

1838

Madame Charles [Henriette Etienne Fanny] Reybaud. “Les Épaves.” Revue de Paris (Feb.); reprinted in Valdepeiras (Paris: Hachette, 1864).

1839

Alexis Decomberousse et Benjamin Antier. Le Marché de Saint-Pierre, mélodrama in 5 acts (dramatization of Reybaud 1838, produced Théâtre de Gaîté, 20 July 1839).

1839

Paul Foucher et Laurencin [Paul-Aimé Chapelle]. Maria: drame en 2 actes; reprinted in Magasin théatral 24.

1839

Frederick Marryat. A Diary in America, esp. vol. III: 56–58.

1839

Cirilo Villaverde. Cecilia Valdés (first version of part 1).

1840

Hans Christian Andersen. Mulatten: originalt romantisk Drama i Fem Akter (inspired by Reybaud 1838).

1840

Eugène Chapus. “L’Amour d’une Créole.” Babel: publication de la société des gens de lettres II, 37–76.

1840

Lamartine. La Marseillaise noire.

1840

Harriet Martineau. The Hour and the Man.

1841

Lydia Maria Child. “Annette Gray.” Anti-Slavery Standard, 22 July.

1841

Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda. Sab.

1841

[Joseph Holt Ingraham], The Quadroone; or St Michael’s Day.

1841

William Gilmore Simms. “Caloya; or, The Loves of the Driver.” The Magnolia 3 (May, June, July): 222–29, 264–73, 317–24.

1842

Lydia Maria Child. “The Quadroons.” Liberty Bell, reprinted in Fact and Fiction.

1842

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. “The Quadroon Girl.”

1842

Sarmiento. “El Oro, ó Dios nos assista!” 5 May.

1842

Eugène Scribe. Le Code noir, opéra-comique in 3 acts (dramatization of Reybaud 1838); in (Euvres complètes: opéras comiques, 277–382.

1842

William Gilmore Simms. Beauchampe; or, The Kentucky Tragedy. A Tale of Passion. 2 vols. (Kinney) (sequel to Charlemont; or, The Pride of the Village: A Tale of Kentucky).

1842

Alfred Lord Tennyson. “Locksley Hall.”

1842

Walt Whitman. Franklin Evans; or, The Inebriate. A Tale of the Times. In New World II (no. 10, Extra Series, Nov.) (1846 version significantly changed).

1843

Alexandre Dumas (père). Georges.

1843

J. C. Nott. “The Mulatto a Hybrid—Probable Extermination of the Two Races If the Whites and Blacks Are Allowed to Intermarry.” American Journal of Medical Sciences 66 July): 252–56.

1843

Eugène Sue. Les Mystères de Paris. Reprinted in 1851. Esp. ch. xxi-xxii.

1845

Horatio der Mulatt; romantisches Drama in fünf Aufzügen. Nach H.C. Andersen frei bearbeitet von Le Petit.

1845

Frederick Douglass. The Narrative of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.

1845

Margaret Fuller. Letter to Ellis and Louisa Loring, 22 Aug.

1845

Armand Lanusse, ed. Les Cenelles.

1846

Anicet Bourgeois and Philippe Dumanoir. Le Docteur noir, drama in 7 acts [Porte Saint-Martin, 20 July 1846]. The Black Doctor: A Drama in Five Acts. Trans. I. V. Bridgeman and adapted by publisher (first performed Paris 30 Junly [sic] 1846; as played at the Royal Victoria Theatre, 13 Nov. 1846) (5 acts). The Black Doctor. Adapted for the English stage by Ira Aldridge. 1847 [4 acts].

1846

[Howard Meeks]. The Fanatic; or, The Perils of Peter Pliant, the Poor Pedagogue.

1846

[Howard Meeks]. Winona; or, The Brown Maid of the South (no copy known).

1847

Charlotte Brontë. Jane Eyre.

1847

Paul Féval. Le Mendiant noir.

1848

William Henry Brisbane. “Amanda: A Tale for the Times.” Serialized in National Era, 23 March 1848: 48; 30 March: 52; and 6 April: 56; published as book Amanda: A Tale for the Times.

1848

Elizabeth Barrett Browning. “The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point” (poem).

1848

I[gnaz Vincent] F[ranz] Castelli. “Die Verlassenschaft des Pflanzers.” Erzählungen Bd. 4 (Sämmtliche Werke Bd. 8).

1848

Henry Senior. Charles Vernon.

1848

Michael William Balfe. Der Mulatte: Romantische Oper.

1849

Mrs. Emma D. E. Nevitt Southworth. Retribution; or, The Vale of Shadows. A Tale of Passion.

1849

Albert W. Sumner. The Sea Lark; or, The Quadroon of Louisiana. A Thrilling Tale of Land and Sea.

1850

Alphonse de Lamartine. Toussaint-Louverture, drama in 5 acts [Porte Saint-Martin, 14Jan.],

1850

Daniel Whitney. Warren: A Tragedy in Five Acts Designated to Illustrate the Protection Which the Federal Union Extends to Citizens of Massachusetts.

1851

Barbey d’Aurevilly. Une vieille maîtresse, reedited with a preface by Paul Morand.

1852

Paul Heyse. “Urica” (written in November). In Novellen in Versen I (Gesammelte Werke 2): 1–29.

1852

[Richard Hildreth]. The White Slave; or, Memoirs of a Fugitive (chapters 37–59 added; see 1836, 1856).

1852

Harriet Beecher Stowe. Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly. Esp. ch. xxxiv, “The Quadroon’s Story.”

1853

William G. Allen. American Prejudice Against Color (Allen, the professor of Greek and German at Central College, had just married one of his white students, causing a scandal).

1853

William Wells Brown. Clotel; or, The President’s Daughter.

1853

M. J. McIntosh. The Lofty and the Lowly; or, Good in All and None All-Good. 2 vols.

1853

Pocahontas [Emily C. Pearson]. Cousin Franck’s House-hold; or, Scenes in the Old Dominion.

1853

Theodore Poesche and Charles Goepp. The New Rome; or, The United States of the World.

1853

[R.] Max Radiguet [or Max-Radiguet?]. “Un bamboula à la Martinique.” La France maritime. 2e éd. IV: 334–36 [or 355?].

1854

El Midato: periódico politico, literario y de costumbres (includes serialized novel “El Negro martir”).

1854

Mary Langdon [Mrs. Mary H. Pike], Ida May: A Story of Things Actual and Possible.

1855

Elizabeth D. Livermore. Zoe; or, The Quadroon’s Triumph: A Tale for the Times.

1855

W. W. Smith. The Planter’s Victim (Brown (identical with The Yankee Slave Driver, 1859); Zanger).

1856

Paul Creyton [John Townsend Trowbridge]. Neighbor Jackwood.

1856

Richard Hildreth. Archy Moore, the White Slave; or, Memoirs of a Fugitive. With a New Introduction (see 1836, 1852).

1856

Frederick Law Olmstead. A Journey in the Seaboard Slave States (description of alliances between upper—class white men and Quadroon women).

1856

James S. Peacocke. The Creole Orphans; or, Lights and Shadows of Southern Life. A Tale of Louisiana.

1856

Mayne Reid. The Quadroon; or, A Lover’s Adventures in Louisiana; cited from The Quadroon; or, Adventures in the Far West.

1856

Sidney A. Story, Jr. [Mary Pike]. Caste: A Story of Republican Equality.

1856

Harriet Beecher Stowe. Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp.

1856

George Vashon, Autographs of Freedom, esp. poems “Vincent Ogé” and “A Life Day.”

1857

Harriet Hamline Bigelow. The Curse Entailed.

1857

Van Buren Denslow. Owned and Disowned; or, The Chattel Child.

1857

[Mattie Griffiths]. Autobiography of a Female Slave.

1857

Charles Kingsley. Two Years Ago (Girouard, about doctor and subplot “Elsie”; Marie, “La Cordifiamma” in eh. 9, “Am I Not a Woman and a Sister?”).

1857

J.[ohn] T.[ownsend] Trowbridge. Neighbor Jackwood: A Domestic Drama in Five Acts (produced 16 March, 1857).

1857

Frank J. Webb. The Garies and Their Friends.

1858

“The Quadroon’s Revenge.” National Anti-Slavery Standard 19 (Sept./Oct.).

1858

William Wells Brown. The Escape; or, A Leap for Freedom.

1858

Lydia Maria Child. “The Stars and Stripes: A Melodrama.” In The Liberty Bell.

1858

Mrs. C. W. [Mary (Andrews)] Denison. Old Hepsy (reviewed in National Era, 8 April).

1858

Frances H. McDougall. Shamah in Pursuit of Freedom; or, The Branded Hand.

1858

Victor Séjour. “The Brown Overcoat.”

1858

Dr. C. Testut. Le Vieux Salomon (written 1858; published in 1872; French plantation novel).

1859

Dion Boucicault. The Octoroon; or, Life in Louisiana. A Play in Five Acts.

1859

Martin R. Delany. Blake; or, The Huts of America. In Anglo-African Magazine (Jan.-July).

1859

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper. “Two Offers.” The Anglo-African Magazine I, 9 and 10 (Sept.-Oct.): 288–91, 311–13.

1859

William White Smith. The Yankee Slave Driver; or, The Black and White Rivals.

1859

Mrs. H. E. Wilson. Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black in a Two-Story White House, North. Showing That Slavery’s Shadows Fall Even There.

1859/60

Mattie Griffiths. “Madge Vertner.” 38 chapters serialized in National Anti-Slavery Standard 20–21 (30 July 1859–5 May 1860).

1860

Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom; or, The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery.

1860

[Mrs. G. M. Flanders], The Ebony Idol.

1860

J, Davis Harris. “A Summer on the Borders of the Caribbean Sea.” In Howard H. Bell, Black Separatism, and the Caribbean.

1860

H. S. Hosmer. Adela, the Octoroon.

1860

William Dean Howells. “The Pilot’s Story.” Atlantic Monthly (Oct.).

1860

William Henry Peck. The Moctoroon. Performed in New York by Christy’s Minstrels at Niblo’s Concert Saloon, 23 Jan.

1861

Charles Baudelaire. Les Fleurs du mal. “Sed non satiata” (26 & 27).

1861

Linda Brent [Harriet Jacobs]. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

1861

Rev. H[iram] Mattison. Louisa Picquet, the Octoroon Slave and Concubine: A Tale of Southern Slave Life.

1861

M. T. S. [Mary] Putnam. Tragedy of Success and Tragedy of Errors.

1861

Mrs. Metta Victoria Victor. Maum Guinea, and Her Plantation “Children”; or, Holiday-Week on a Louisiana Estate: A Slave Romance.

1862

“The Deserter.” Harper’s Weekly 6 (14 June, 1862): 37–38.

1862

“In Western Missouri.” Harper’s Weekly 6 (1 March, 1862): 138–39.

1862

S. C. Blackwell. “Fugitives at the West.” Continental Monthly 1 (May 1862): 584–91.

1862[?]

Miss M[ary] E. Braddon. The Octoroon, n.d. (1896 is Harvard library acquisition date; Rogers II: 331 dates it 1862; Braddon originally serialized “The Octoroon; or, The Lily of Louisiana” in The Halfpenny Journal sometime between 1861 and 1865, shortly after the publication, and at the peak of the publicity, of Boucicault’s Octoroon; plagiarized from Boucicault and Reid).

1862

Edmund Kirke [James Roberts Gilmore], Among the Pines; or, South in Secession-Time (vol. 1 of trilogy).

1862

Nora Perry. “Clotilde and the Contraband.” Harper’s Monthly 24 (May 1862): 764–71.

1862

M. T. S. [Mary] Putnam. Tragedy of Success.

1863

Louis Agassiz’s letters to Dr. Howe.

1863

[Louisa May Alcott]. “The Brothers.” Atlantic Monthly 12 (Nov. 1863): 584–95.

1863

Louisa May Alcott. “M.L.”

[1863]

[David Goodman Croly and George Wakeman]. Miscegenation: The Theory of the Blending of the Races Applied to the American White and Negro (appeared in 1863 but with 1864 imprimatur; see Kaplan, “Miscegenation,” 277).

1863

[James Roberts Gilmore]. My Southern Friends (Kinney) (vol. 2 of trilogy).

1864

“Buried Alive.” Harper’s Weekly 8 (7 May, 1864): 302.

1864

“The Devil’s Frying Pan.” Harper’s Weekly 8 (7 May, 1864): 294–95.

1864

“The Revenge of the Goddess.” Harper’s Weekly 8 (24 Sept, 1864): 622–23.

1864

“Why It Could Not Be.” Harper’s Weekly 8 (25 June, 1864): 406–7.

1864

James H. Hackett, Notes and Comments upon Certain Plays and Actors of Shakespeare, With Criticisms and Correspondence. Pp. 217–28, also 229 and the reprint of “Desdemona,” 234–49.

1864

Edmund Kirke [James Roberts Gilmore]. Down in Tennessee, and Back by Way of Richmond (vol. 3 of trilogy).

1864

Epes Sargent. Peculiar: A Tale of the Great Transition.

1864

L. Seaman, Ll.D. What Miscegenation Is! and What we are to expect now that Mr. Lincoln is re-elected.

1864

George Boyer Vashon. “A Life-Day” (126–line poem, in sections “Morning,” “Noon,” and “Night,” tells story of marriage between white southerner and slave woman, that ends with his death and the family’s reenslavement).

1865

Helen Pierson. “Chip.” Harper’s Monthly 31 (July 1865): 254–58.

1865

Elizabeth Stoddard. Two Men.

1865

Theodor Storm. “Von jenseit des Meeres.” Wester-manns Illtistrierte Deutsche Monatshefte, Jan. 1865 (written in 1863/64; book publication 1867).

1866

D. R. Castleton. “The St. Leons.” Harper’s Monthly 33 (Aug. 1866): 373–84.

1866

W. H. Palmer. “A Woman.” Galaxy 2 (Nov. 1866): 413–23.

1866

de Roosmalen. Le Nègre. Le Mulatre. Plaidoyers dramatiques en faveur des hommes de couleur, présentés sous la forme de comédies.

1866

M. Schele De Vere. “The Freedman’s Story.” Harper’s Monthly 33 (Oct. 1866): 647–57.

1867

Lorenzo D. Blackson. The Rise and Progress of the Kingdom of Light and Darkness.

1867

Lydia Maria Child. A Romance of the Republic.

1867

James Schönberg. Oscar the Half Blood: A Sensational Play in a Prologue and Four Acts. Performed at Wood’s Theatre, New York, 27 March; pub. Dick’s Standard Plays #474.

1867

Edward Spencer. “Tristan: A Story.” Galaxy 3.1 (1 Jan.): 5–23; 3.2 (15 Jan.): 117–40; 3.3 (1 Feb.): 229–39.

1868

Rebecca Harding Davis. Waiting for the Verdict.

1868

John William De Forest. “A Gentleman of an Old School.” Atlantic Monthly 21 (May 1868): 546–55.

1868

Anna E. Dickinson. What Answer?

1869

Louisa May Alcott. “An Hour” and “My Contraband.” In Camp and Fireside Stories.

1869

Wilkie Collins and Charles Fechter. Black and White. A Drama in Three Acts (first produced by Charles Dickens).

1869

John Hay. “The Foster-Brothers.” Harper’s Monthly 39 (Sept. 1869): 535–44.

1870

Freeman S. Bowley. “A Dark Night on Picket.” Over-land Monthly 5 (July 1870): 31–37.

1870

T[heoda] F[oster] B[ush], “Clara’s Choice.” New National Era 1 (24 March, 1870): 4.

1870

Maria Louise Pool. “Told by an Octoroon.” Galaxy 10 (Dec. 1870): 827–38.

1871

The Sisters of Orleans: A Tale of Race and Social Conflict.

1871

Thomas Detter. Nellie Brown; or, The Jealous Wife, With Other Sketches. Esp. short story “Octoroon Slave of Cuba” (119–42) and sketch “My Trip to Baltimore” (143–48).

1872

Alice Dutton. “The Castleworth Tragedy.” Atlantic Monthly 29 (Feb. 1872): 197–209.

1874

George Washington Cable. “’Tite Poulette.” Scribner’s (Oct.).

1874

Henry Churton [Albion W. Tourgée]. Toinette: A Novel.

1874

Constance Fenimore Woolson. “Jeannette.” Scribner’s Monthly 9 (Dec. 1874): 232–43.

1875

Bernardo Guimarães. A Escrava Isaura (Brazilian anti-slavery novel; French translation: L’esclave Isaura, 1986).

1876

Mme. van den Bussche [Marie Emery]. Les Nègres de la Louisiane; scènes américaines. 5ème éd.

1877

Sarah A. Dorsey. Panola: A Tale of Louisiana.

1879

George Washington Cable. Old Creole Days.

1879/80

George Washington Cable. The Grandissimes: A Story of Creole Life; first in Scribner’s, Nov. 1879–Oct. 1880.

1880

Joaquim Maria Achado de Assis. Memorie postume di Braz Cubas.

1880

Sherwood Bonner. “Volcanic Interlude.”

1880

Albion W. Tourgée. Bricks Without Straw.

1881

Aluísio [Tancredo Gonçalves de] Azevedo. O Mulato. Translations: El Mulato, versión castellana de Jesús de Amber; Der Mulatte, trans, into German by Michael O. Güsten, 1964; Mulatto, trans, by Murray Graeme MacNicholl, ed. Daphne Patai, 1990.

1881

George Washington Cable. Madame Delphine (first published in Scribner’s, May, June, July).

1881

Pierre Loti. Le Roman d’un Spahi.

1881

Dr. Alfred Mercier. L ’Habitation St. Ybars (Louisiana novel).

1881

Albion W. Tourgée. A Royal Gentleman (reprint of Churton, 1874).

1882

Subdued Southern Nobility: A Southern Ideal. By One of the Nobility.

1882

Bartley Campbell. “The White Slave” (play holograph; printed 1909).

1882

Cirilo Villaverde. Cecilia Valdés; o La Loma del Ángel. Novela de costumbres cubanas (critical ed, 1953). Trans. Mariano J. Lorente, The Quadroon; or, Cecilia Valdes. A Romance of Old Havana, 1935.

1883

Albion W. Tourgée. Hot Plowshares: A Novel.

1884

The Shadow of the War: A Story of the South in Reconstruction Times.

1884

L. V. Denance. La Famille de Martel le planteur: épisode de la révolution de Saint-Domingue.

1884

Joel Chandler Harris. “Where’s Duncan?” (see also 1891).

1884

Frederic Allison Tupper. Moonshine: A Stoiy of the Reconstruction Period.

1885

Le Planteur de la Guyane ou les Nègres chrétiens. Trans, and reprod. from the German, by P.-C. [F.-C.] Gérard.

1885

Henry W. Grady. “In Plain Black and White.” Century 29.7 (1885): 909–17 (a response to “The Freedman’s Case in Equity”).

1886

Jules-Berlioz d’Auriac. La Guerre noire: souvenirs de Saint-Domingue.

1886

Margaret Holmes Bates. The Chamber Over the Gate.

1886

James H. W. Howard. Bond and Free: A True Tale of Slave Times.

1886

Grace Elizabeth King. “Bonne Maman.” Harper’s duly).

1886

Grace Elizabeth King. “Monsieur Motte.” New Prince ton Review (Jan.).

1887

R. T. Buckner. Towards the Gulf: A Romance of Louisiana.

1887

Mary Peabody Mann. Juanita: A Romance of Cuba Fifty Years Ago.

1887

Giuseppe Verdi. Otello.

1888/89

George Washington Cable. “Attalie Brouillard,” “The Haunted House on Royal Street,” and “Salome Müller, the White Slave.” In Strange True Stories of Louisiana (first published in Scribner’s, Nov. 1888–Oct. 1889).

1888

James Edwin Campbell. “The Pariah’s Love.” AME Church Review 5 (April 1889): 370–74.

1888

Lizzie M. Elwyn. Millie; the Quadroon (drama).

1888

Grace Elizabeth King. Monsieur Motte (first part is the story first pub. in 1886).

1889

Charles W. Chesnutt. “What Is a White Man?” Independent, 30 May.

1889

Anatole France. Balthasar.

1889

William N. Harben. White Marie.

1889

Guy de Maupassant. “Boitelle.” In La main gauche. Reprinted in Contes et nouvelles II, ed. Louis Forestier.

1890

Miss Breckenridge: A Daughter of Dixie.

1890

Lafcadio Hearn. Two Years in the French West Indies (a perfect companion piece to Youma).

1890

Lafcadio Hearn. Youma.

1890

Grace Elizabeth King. Monsieur Motte.

1890

Albion W. Tourgée. Pactolus Prime.

1891

Joel Chandler Harris. “Where’s Duncan?” In Balaam and His Master and Other Sketches and Stories.

1891

William Dean Howells. An Imperative Duty.

1892

George Washington Cable. “A West Indian Slave Insurrection.” Scribner’s Magazine 12.6 (Dec. 1892): 709–20, also included in The Flower of the Chapdelaines, 1918.

1892

Matt Crim. “Was It an Exceptional Case?” (first pub. 1891). In In Beaver Cove and Elsewhere.

1892

Frederick Douglass. The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass.

1892

Mrs. Frances E. W. Harper. Iola Leroy; or, Shadows Uplifted.

1892

Marietta Holley. Samantha on the Race Problem, (see also 1894).

1893

George Washington Cable. Old Creole Days. Includes “’Tite Poulette.”

1893

Kate Chopin. “The Father of Désirée’s Baby.” Vogue.

1893

Sara B. Groenvelt. “Otille the Quadroone: A Tragedy in Five Acts.” Typescript, Library of Congress.

1893

Richard Malcolm Johnston. “Ishmael.” Lippincott’s 52: 359–66.

1893

Grace Elizabeth King. Balcony Stories. Reprinted in 1914, esp. “The Little Convent Girl.”

1894

“Josiah Allen’s Wife” [Marietta Holley]. Samantha Among the Colored Folks: “My Ideas on the Race Problem.”

1894

Kate Chopin. Bayou Folk. Including “Desirée’s Baby,” first pub. in 1893.

1894

John Mercer Langston. From the Virginia Plantation to the National Capitol, esp. ch. 1.

1894

Mark Twain. Pudd’nhead Wilson: A Tale (cited from Pudd’nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins, ed. Sidney E. Berger, 1980).

1894

Amelia E. Johnson. The Hazcley Family.

1894

Thomas Nelson Page. In “How Andrew Carried the Precinct.” Pastime Stories (Mencke).

1894

Sanda [Walter Stowers and William Anderson], Appointed.

1895

P[aul?] Bourget. Cosmopolis; story of Napoléon Chapron, 191–96.

1895

James Edwin Campbell. “A Love Dream” and “The Pariah.” In Echoes…From the Cabin and Elsewhere.

1895

Alice I. Jones. Beatrice of Bayou Têche.

1895

Bliss Perry. The Plated City.

1895

Albert Ross [pseud.]. A Black Adonis.

1896

George Washington Cable. Madame Delphine (also in In Old Creole Days, but here with new preface).

1896

Carlos Malheiro Dias. A Mulata. Romance. Reprinted in 1975.

1896

J. McHenry Jones. Hearts of Gold: A Novel.

1896

Opie Read. My Young Master.

1897

G. de Raulin [de Gustave Joseph Henri Landrieu]. Owanga, amours exotiques.

1898

Mary Johnston. Prisoners of Hope: A Tale of Colonial Virginia.

1898

Thomas Nelson Page. Red Rock: A Chronicle of Reconstruction.

1899

Charles W. Chesnutt. The Wife of His Youth.

1899

Sutton Griggs, Imperium in Imperio.

1900

Gertrude Atherton. Senator North.

1900

Charles W. Chesnutt. The House Behind the Cedars.

1900

Pauline E. Hopkins. Contending Forces: A Romance Illustrative of Negro Life.

1900

Pauline Hopkins. “General Washington: A Christmas Story.” Colored American Magazine 2 (Nov. 1900): 95–104.

1900

Pauline E. Hopkins. “Talma Gordon.” Colored American Magazine 1.5 (Oct. 1900): 271–90.

1900

Jack Thorne [David Bryant Fulton], Hanover; or, The Persecution of the Lowly: A Story of the Wilmington Massacre.

1901

Charles W. Chesnutt. The Marrow of Tradition.

1901

Payne Erskine. When the Gates Lift Up Their Heads: A Story of the Seventies.

1901

Sutton E. Griggs. Overshadowed.

1901

Pauline E. Hopkins. “A Dash for Liberty.” Colored American Magazine 3.4 (Aug. 1901): 243–47.

1901

Belle Kearney. A Slaveholder’s Daughter: An Autobiography.

1901

Wm. C. Townsend. Love and Liberty (novel).

1901

Albery A. Whitman. An Idyl of the South: An Epic Poem in Two Parts (derived from Vashon 1856?).

1901/2

Sarah A. Allen [Pauline E. Hopkins]. “Hagar’s Daughter: A Story of Southern Caste Prejudice.” Colored American Magazine beginning 3.1 (March 1901): 337 ff, 24–34, 117–28, 185–95, 262–72, 343–53, 425–35; 4 (1902): 23–33, 113–24, 188–200,281–91.

1902

Sarah A. Allen [Pauline E. Hopkins]. “The Test of Manhood (A Christmas Story).” Colored American Magazine 4.6 (Dec.): 113–20.

1902

James D. Corrothers. The Black Cat Club.

1902

Thomas Dixon, Jr. The Leopard’s Spots: A Romance of the White Man’s Burden—1865–1910.

1902

Paul Laurence Dunbar. The Sport of the Gods.

1902

I. Dwight Fairfield. “A Modern Othello” (poem). Colored American Magazine (Dec.): 125–27.

1902

Charles H. Fowler. Historical Romance of the American Negro.

1902

Sutton E. Griggs. Unfettered.

1902

Joel Chandler Harris. Gabriel Tolliver: A Story of Reconstruction.

1902

[Pauline Hopkins]. “Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest.” Colored American Magazine 5 (May 1902–0ct. 1902).

1902

G. Langhorne Pryor. Neither Bond nor Free (A Plea).

1902

Hugues Rebell. Les Nuits chandes du Cap Français. Reprinted with a preface by d’Auriant and an afterword by Hubert Juin.

1902

Ruth D. Todd. “The Octoroon’s Revenge.” Colored American Magazine 4[?]: 291–95.

1902/3

Pauline Hopkins. “Of One Blood; Or, The Hidden Self.” Colored American Magazine (Nov. 1902–Nov. 1903).

1903

Cyrus T. Brady. A Doctor of Philosophy (novel; Rogers, Sex and Race, III: 330).

1903

Mrs. M. Louise Burgess-Ware. “Bernice the Octoroon.” Colored American Magazine (Aug. 1903): 607–61; (Sept. 1903): 652–57.

1903

W.E.B. Du Bois. The Souls of Black Folk (esp. “The Coming of John”).

1903

Marius-Ary Leblond. Le Zézère, amours de Blancs et de Noirs.

1903

Theodore E. D. Nash. Love and Vengeance.

1904

Edward A. Johnson. Light Ahead for the Negro.

1904

Frank Norris. The Octopus: A Story of California.

1905

Norah Davis. The Northerner.

1905

Thomas Dixon, Jr. The Clansman: A Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan.

1905

Thomas Dixon, Jr. “The Clansman: An American Drama. From the Material of His Two Novels ‘The Leopard’s Spots’ and ‘The Clansman.’” Typescript, Harvard Theater Collection.

1905

Sutton E. Griggs. The Hindered Hand; or, The Reign of the Repressionist.

1906

Thomas Dixon, Jr. “Why I Wrote ‘The Clansman.’” Theatre 6 (Jan. 1906): 20–22.

1906

George Marion McClellan. Old Greenbottom Inn and Other Stories.

1907

Mary Evelyn [Moore] Davis. The Price of Silence.

1907

Thomas Dixon, Jr. The Traitor: A Story of the Fall of the Invisible Empire.

1907

James E. McGirt. “In Love and War.” In The Triumphs of Ephraim.

1907

Fannie Barrier Williams. “Perils of the White Negro.” Colored American Magazine 13 (Dec.): 421–23.

1908

Margaret Deland. “A Black Drop.” In R.J.’s Mother, and Some Other People.

1908

Margaret Deland. “The Black Drop.” Serial in Collier’s Weekly, beginning May 2.

1908

Robert Lee Durham. The Call of the South.

1908

Sutton E. Griggs. Pointing the Way.

1909

John Wesley Grant. Out of the Darkness; or, Diabolism and Destiny.

1909

[Walter Hines Page]. The Southerner: A Novel: Being the Autobiography of Nicholas Worth.

1909

Gertrude Stein. Three Lives.

1910

Edward Sheldon. The Nigger: An American Play in Three Acts.

1910

Robert Lewis Waring. As We See It.

1910

Ulysses G. Weatherly. “Race and Marriage.” American Journal of Sociology 15.4 (Jan. 1910): 433–53.

1911

Alexander Corkey. The Testing Fire.

1911

W. E. B. Du Bois. The Quest of the Silver Fleece.

1911

William E. Waston. Christophe.

1912

Joseph S[eamon] Cotter. Negro Tales, esp. “Rodney” (23–34) and “Tesney, the Deceived” (35–49).

1912

Thomas Dixon. The Sins of the Father: A Romance of the South.

1912

James Weldon Johnson. The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man.

1912

Yorke Jones. The Climbers.

1913

Ellen Glasgow. Virginia, esp. book 2, ch. 9: “The Problem of the South.”

1913

Hans Grimm. Südafrikanische Novellen.

1913

Oscar Micheaux. The Conquest: A Story of a Negro Pioneer, ch. 25, “The Scotch Girl.”

1914

Thomas Pearce Bailey. Race Orthodoxy in the South. Reprinted in 1972.

1914

George Washington Cable. Gideon’s Band: A Tale of the Mississippi.

1915

William M. Ashby. Redder Blood.

1915

Dorothy Canfield [Fisher]. The Bent Twig.

1915

F. Grant Gilmore. “The Problem”: A Military Novel.

1915

Oscar Micheaux. The Forged Note: A Romance of the Darker Races.

1915

Otis M. Shackleford. Lillian Simmons; or, The Conflict of Sections.

1915

Thomas H. B. Walker. J. Johnson; or, The Unknown Man: An Answer to Mrs. Thomas Dixon’s “Sins of the Fathers.”

1916

Don Marquis. “Mulatto.” Harper’s (April 1916).

1917

Clayton Adams [Charles Henry Holmes], Ethiopia, the Land of Promise: A Book With a Purpose.

1917

Henry F. Downing. The American Cavalryman: A Liberian Romance.

1917

George W. Ellis. The Leopard’s Claw.

1917

Sarah L. Fleming. Hope’s Highway.

1917

Oscar Micheaux. The Homesteader (rewritten in 1941).

1917

Joel Augustus Rogers. From. “Superman” to Man.

1918

George Washington Cable. The Flower of the Chapdelaines (includes “A West Indian Slave Insurrection,” first published in 1892).

1918

George Washington Cable. Lovers of Louisiana.

1918

Joseph Cotter, Jr. “The Mulatto to His Critics.” In The Band of Gideon, 5; also reprinted in Negro Poets and Their Poems (1923), ed. Robert Kerlin.

1918

Edwin Byron Reuter. The Mulatto in the United States, Including a Study of the Role of Mixed-Blood Races Throughout the World.

1918

Carter G. Woodson. “The Beginnings of Miscegenation of the Whites and Blacks.” Journal of Negro History 3.4: 335–53.

1919

Herman Dreer. The Immediate Jewel of His Soul.

1919

Robert A. Tracy. The Sword of Nemesis.

1920

W. E. B. Du Bois. Darkwater, esp. “The Comet” and “The Damnation of Women.”

1920

Paul Green. White Dresses: A Sorrow of First Love.

1920

William McFee. Captain Macedoine’s Daughter.

1920

Mary White Ovington. The Shadow.

1920

Stella George [Stern] Perry. Palmetto: The Romance of a Louisiana Girl.

1920

Zara Wright. Black and White Tangled Threads and sequel, Kenneth.

1921

John Bennett. Madame Margot: A Grotesque Legend of Old Charleston.

1922

Georgia Douglas Johnson. “The Octoroon.” In Bronze: A Book of Verse.

1922

William Pickens. The Vengeance of the Gods and Other Stories of Real American Color Line Life, title story only (11–86) (invites comparison with Pudd’nhead Wilson).

1922

T. S. Stribling. Birthright.

1923

Waldo Frank. Holiday.

1923

Ottie B. Graham. “Holiday.” Crisis 26.1 (May): 12–7.

1923

Gertrude Sanborn. Veiled Aristocrats.

1923

Jean Toomer. Cane. See also his “Withered Skin of Berries.”

1924

John T. Dorsey. The Lion of Judah.

1924

Jessie Fauset. There Is Confusion.

1924

Ronald Firbank. Prancing Nigger. Intro. Carl Van Vechten.

1924

Joshua Henry Jones. By Sanction of Law.

1924

Vara A. Majette. White Blood.

1924

Leonard Merrick. The Quaint Companions.

1924

Sarah Gertrude Millin. God’s Step-Children.

1924

Eugene O’Neill. “All God’s Chillun Got Wings.” American Mercury 1.2 (Feb. 1924): 129–48.

1924

Walter White. The Fire in the Flint.

1925

Countée Cullen. “Near White.” Color, 11.

1925

Rudolph Fisher. “High Yaller.” The Crisis 30–31: 281–86; 33–38.

1925

David Garnett. The Sailor’s Return.

1925

Langston Hughes. “Cross.” In The Weary Blues.

1925

Georgia Douglas Johnson. “The Riddle.” In The New Negro, ed. Alain Locke.

1925

Harry F. Liscomb. The Prince of Washington Square.

1925

Claude McKay. “The Mulatto.” Bookman 72 (Sept. 1925): 67.

1925

Joan Sutherland. Challenge.

1926

Barry Benefield. Short Turns, esp. story, “Simply Sugar Pie” (219–34).

1926

Maxwell Bodenheim. Ninth Avenue (Brown: intermarriage plot evocative of O’Neill).

1926

Joshua A. Brockett. Zipporah, the Maid of Midian.

1926

Caroline Bond Day. “The Pink Hat.” Opportunity (Dec.): 379–80.

1926

Arthur H. Estabrook and Ivan E. McDougle. Mongrel Virginians: The Win Tribe (nonfiction: small group of “Indian-negro-white crosses”).

1926

Edna Ferber. Show Boat.

1926

Claire [Liliane] Goll. Der Neger Jupiter raubt Europa (reviewed under the title Le Nègre Jupiter enlève Europa “The Negro Jupiter Ravishes Europe” by Cullen in 1929).

1926

Paul Green. “The End of the Row.” In Lonesome Road.

1926

Myrtle A. Smith Livingston. “For Unborn Children.” The Crisis 32.3 (July 1926): 122–25; play won third prize in Crisis contest of 1925.

1926

Joan Sutherland. Challenge.

1926

Walter White. Flight.

1927

Countée Cullen. The Ballad of the Brown Girl: An Old Ballad Retold.

1927

Paul Green. The Field God and In Abraham’s Bosom,.

1927

Langston Hughes. “Mulatto” and “Red Silk Stockings.” In Fine Clothes to the Jew.

1927

Zora Neale Hurston. “The First One.” In Plays of Negro Life, eds. Alain Locke and Montgomery Gregory.

1927

Grace Lumpkin. “White Man.”

1927

Julia Peterkin. Black April.

1927

Elizabeth Madox Roberts. My Heart and My Flesh.

1927

Evelyn Scott. Migrations.

1927

Lucy White. “The Bird Child.” In Plays of Negro Life, eds. Alain Locke and Montgomery Gregory.

1928

Confessions of a Negro Preacher.

1928

Rudolph Fisher. The Walls of Jericho.

1928

Isa Glenn. A Short History of Julia.

1928

Paul Green. “The Goodbye.” In In the Valley, and Other Carolina Plays.

1928

Marcet and Emanuel Haldeman-Julius. Violence: A Story of Today’s South.

1928

Roland E. Hartley and Caroline Power. “Madame Delphine.” In Short Plays from Great Stories, eds. Hartley and Power (based on George Washington Cable).

1928

Leslie Pinckney Hill. Toussaint L’Ouverture.

1928

Langston Hughes. “Mulatto: A Tragedy of the Deep South” (first produced in 1935).

1928

Georgia Douglas Johnson. “Blue Blood.” In Fifty More Contemporary One-Act Plays, ed. Frank Shay.

1928

Nella Larsen. Quicksand.

1928

Enrique López Albújar. Matalaché: novela retaguardista.

1928

Robert E. Park. “Human Migration and the Marginal Man.” American Journal of Sociology 33: 881–93.

1928

Edward Larocque Tinker. Toucoutou.

1929

Roark Bradford. This Side of Jordan.

1929

Vera Caspary. The White Girl.

1929

Albert E.[vander] Coleman. The Romantic Adventures of Rosy, the Octoroon: With Some Account of the Persecution of the Southern Negroes During the Reconstruction Period.

1929

Narena Easterling. Broken Lights: A Novel.

1929

Jessie Fauset. Plum Bun.

1929

Lafcadio Hearn. “The Original Bras Coupé.” In Essays on American Literature.

1929

DuBose Heyward. Mamba’s Daughters.

1929

Nella Larsen. Passing.

1929

Evelyn Scott. The Wave.

1929

Howard Snyder. Earth Born: A Novel of the Plantation.

1929

Wallace Thurman. The Blacker the Berry.

1929

Evans Wall. The No-Nation Girl.

1930

Gilmore Millen. Sweet Man.

1930

Gertrude Shelby and Samuel G. Stoney. Po’ Buckra.

1931

R. Hernekin Baptist. Four Handsome Negresses: The Record of a Voyage.

1931

Jessie Fauset. The Chinaberry Tree.

1931

William S. Henry. Out of Wedlock.

1931

DuBose Heyward. Brass Ankle.

1931

Alin Laubreaux. Mulatto Johnny. Trans. from the French by Coley Taylor.

1931

Robert E. Park. “Mentality of Racial Hybrids.” American Journal of Sociology 36: 534–51.

1931

Arturo Uslar Pietri. Las Lanzas coloradas.

1931

George Schuyler. Black No More: Being an Account of the Strange and Wonderful Workings of Science in the Land of the Free, A.D. 1933–40.

1931

T. S. Stribling. The Forge.

1932

“Geoffrey Barnes” [James Whittaker]. Dark Lustre.

1932

Countée Cullen. One Way to Heaven.

1932

William Faulkner. Light in August.

1932

Roy Flannagan. Amber Satyr.

1932

Welbourn Kelley. Inchin’ Along.

1932

Claude McKay. “Near-White.” In Gingertown, 72–104.

1932

Donna McKay. A Gentleman in a Black Skin.

1932

Julia Peterkin. Bright Skin.

1932

T. S. Stribling. The Store.

1932

Evans Wall. Love Fetish.

1933

Sterling A. Brown. “Negro Character as Seen by White Authors.” Journal of Negro Education 2 (April 1933): 179–203 (includes discussion of “Tragic Mulatto”).

1933

Jessie Fauset. Comedy, American Style.

1933

E. Franklin Frazier. “Children in Black and Mulatto Families.” American Journal of Sociology 39.1 (July 1933): 12–29.

1933

John H. Hill. Princess Malah.

1933

Fannie Hurst. Imitation of Life.

1933

George Milburn. No More Trumpets, esp. “White Meat.”

1934

Randolph Edmonds. Six Plays for a Negro Theatre, esp. “Breeders” (83–101).

1934

Emily Hahn. Naked Foot.

1934

Langston Hughes. The Ways of White Folks.

1934

William March. Come in at the Door.

1934

T. S. Stribling. Unfinished Cathedral (last part of trilogy; see 1931, 1932).

1934

Clement Wood. Deep River.

1935

Hallie F[erron] Dickerman. Stephen Kent.

1935

Georgia Douglas Johnson. “William and Ellen Craft.” In: Negro History in Thirteen Plays, eds. Willis Richardson and May Miller.

1935

Grace Lumpkin. A Sign for Cain.

1935

May Miller. “Christophe’s Daughters.” In Negro History in Thirteen Plays, eds. Willis Richardson and May Miller.

1935

Willis Richardson. “The Elder Dumas.” In Negro History in Thirteen Plays, eds. Willis Richardson and May Miller.

1935

Samson Raphaelson. “White Man.” In Accent on Youth and White Man.

1935

Elizabeth Madox Roberts. Deep, Dark River.

1935

Robert Rylee. Deep Dark River.

1936

Edwin R. Embree. Brown America: The Story of a New Race.

1936

William Faulkner. Absalom, Absalom!.

1936

Langston Hughes. Mulatto (produced).

1936

O’Wendell Shaw. Greater Need Below.

1936

Marie Stanley. Gulf Stream.

1937

Marjorie Hill Allee. The Great Tradition.

1937

Sterling A. Brown. Negro Poetry and Drama and The Negro in American Fiction.

1937

Rómulo Gallegos. Pobre negro. In Obras completas.

1937

George Washington Lee. River George.

1937

Lyle Saxon. Children of Strangers.

1937

Everett Stonequist. The Marginal Man (contains some unpublished life stories).

1938

William [E. B.] Du Bois. Haiti. In Federal Theatre Plays, ed. Pierre de Rohan.

1938

Mercedes Gilbert. Aunt Sara’s Wooden God.

1938

Julian R. Meade. The Back Door.

1938

Pauli Murray. “Mulatto’s Dilemma.” Opportunity 16 (June 1938): 180.

1938

Henry Nemours Nunez. Chien Negre.

1938

Alfredo Parejo Díaz Conseco. Baldomera: tragedia delcholo americano.

1938

Allen Tate. The Fathers.

1938

Robb White. Run Masked.

1939

Thomas Dixon, Jr. The Flaming Sword.

1939

Artie Shaw. “Octoroon.” Recorded June 5 on Victor Bluebird 10319 (composed by Harry Warren).

1939

Waters E. Turpin. O Canaan!.

1940

Willa Cather. Saphira and the Slave Girl.

1940

John M. Lee. Counter-Clockwise.

1940

George S. Schuyler. “Who Is ‘Negro’? Who Is ‘White’?” Common Ground 1 (Autumn 1940): 53–56.

1942

William Faulkner. Go Down, Moses.

1942

Frances Parkinson Keyes. Crescent Carnival.

1942

J [oel] A. Rogers. Sex and Race: A History of White, Negro, and Indian Miscegenation in the Two Americas. 3 vols.

1942

Marguerite Steen. The Sun Is My Undoing.

1942

Richard Wright. “Black Confession” (with Mulatto episode that did not appear in Black Boy); ms.

1944

Henrietta Buckmaster. Deep River.

1944

Martha Gellhorn. Liana.

1944

Edith Pope. Colcorton.

1944

Lillian Smith. Strange Fruit.

1945

Gwendolyn Brooks. A Street in Bronzeville; esp. “The Ballad of Pearl May Lee” (42–45).

1945

Mark Harris. Trumpet to the World.

1945

Chester Himes. If He Hollers Let Him Go.

1945

Philip Yordan. Anna Lucasta.

1946

Donald Joseph. Straw in the Wind.

1946

Edward Kimbrough. Night Fire.

1946

“Vernon Sullivan” [Boris Vian]. J’irai cracher sur vos tombes (“I Shall Spit on Your Graves”).

1946

Cid Ricketts Summer. Quality.

1946

Mrs. Cid Rickette Sumner. Quality.

1946

Judith Wright. “Half-Caste Girl.” Australian; included in Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Tradition in English.

1946

Frank Yerby. The Foxes of Harrow.

1947

Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895–1968; Italian composer). The Octoroon Ball op. 136.

1947

Chester Himes. Lonely Crusade.

1947

Sinclair Lewis. Kingsblood Royal.

1947

Emil Ludwig. Othello. Trans. Franz von Hildebrand (a novelization of Giraldi’s novella).

1947

Oscar Micheaux. The Masquerade (version of Chesnutt’s The House Behind the Cedars (1900)).

1947

“Vernon Sullivan” [Boris Vian]. Les Morts ont tous la même peau (“All Dead People Have the Same Skin”).

1947

Will Thomas [William Smith]. God Is for White Folks.

1947

William Lindsay White. Lost Boundaries.

1947

Frank Yerby. The Vixens.

1948

Peter Abrahams. The Path of Thunder.

1948

William Faulkner. Intruder in the Dust.

1948

Georges Fouret. La Négresse blonde.

1948

John Hewlett. Harlem Story.

1948

Ross Lockridge, Jr. Raintree County.

1948

William Gardner Smith. The Last of the Conquerors.

1948

Dorothy West. The Living Is Easy.

1948

David Westheimer. Summer on the Water.

1949

Barbara Anderson. Southbound.

1949

Erskine Caldwell. Place Called Esterville.

1949

Frances Gaither. Double Muscadine.

1949

Bucklin Moon. Without Magnolias.

1949

Alberto Moravia. “Il Negro e il vecchio dalla roncola.” In L’amore coniugale. (English: “The Negro and the Old Man with the Scythe.”)

1949

Willard Savoy. Alien Land.

1949

Lillian Smith. Killers of the Dream.

1950

Elizabeth Boatwright Coker. Daughters of Strangers.

1950

Ramón Díaz Sanchez. Cumboto.

1950

Sarah Gertrude Millin. King of the Bastards.

1950

J. Saunders Redding. Stranger and Alone.

1952

Lonnie Coleman. Clara.

1952

Dorothy Lee Dickens. Black on the Rainbow.

1952

Ralph Ellison. Invisible Man.

1952

Alex Gaby. To End the Night.

1952

Ian Gordon. The Night Thorn.

1952

Langston Hughes. “African Morning” and “Who’s Passing for Who?” (short stories). In Laughing to Keep From Crying.

1953

Mouloud Feraoun. La Terre a le sang.

1953

Shirley Ann Grau. The Black Prince and Other Stories, esp. “Miss Yellow Eyes.”

1953

Alan Paton. Too Late the Phalarope.

1953

Ann Petry. The Narrows.

1954

Hamilton Basso. The View from Pompey’s Head.

1954

Chester Himes. The Third Generation.

1954

William Gardner Smith. South Street.

1954

Charles Smythwick, Jr. False Measure: A Satirical Novel of the Lives and Objectives of Upper Middle-Class Negroes.

1954

Charles Tarter. Family of Destiny.

1954

Elizabeth West Wallace. Scandal at Daybreak.

1955

Noel Clad. White Barrier.

1955

Lonnie Coleman. The Southern Lady.

1955

Chester Himes. The Primitive.

1955

Arnold Krieger. Geliebt, gejagt und unvergessen.

1955

Reba Lee. I Passed for White.

1955

Robert Penn Warren. Band of Angels.

1956

Yacine Kateb. Nedjma.

1956

Pauli Murray. Proud Shoes: The Story of an American Family.

1956

Sembène Ousmane. Le Docker noir.

1956

Ferdinand Oyono. Une vie de boy.

1956

Elizabeth Spencer. The Voice at the Back Door.

1957

Peter S. Feibleman. A Place Without Twilight.

1957

Kyle Onstott. Mandingo.

1957

Sembène Ousmane. O pays, mon beau peuple!

1957

Herbert Simmons. Corner Bay.

1958

Fay Liddle Coolidge. Black Is White.

1958

Muriel Spark. “The Black Madonna.” In The Go-Away Bird and Other Stories.

1959

Jacques Stephen Alexis. L’Espace d’un cillement.

1959

Hannah Arendt. “Reflections on Little Rock.” Dissent 6.1 (Winter 1959): 45–56 (emphasizes importance of right to intermarriage).

1959

Hamilton Basso. The Light Infantry.

1959

Leon R. Harris. Run, Zebra, Run!

1959

Herbert D. Kastle. Camera.

1960

Jenn Lawrie. The Marriage of Gor: The True Account of a White Girl’s Life With a Black Man.

1960

Ferdinand Oyono. Chemin d’Europe.

1961

Henry L. Anderson. No Use Cryin’.

1961

[René] Etiemble. Blason d’un corps.

1961

Athol Fugard. The Blood Knot.

1961

Chester Himes. Pinktoes.

1961

Cheikh Hamidou Kane. L’Aventure ambiguë.

1961

M. B. Longman. The Power of Black.

1962

James Baldwin. Another Country.

1962

Robert Gover. One Hundred Dollar Misunderstanding.

1962

Willard Motley. “The Almost White Boy.” In Soon, One Morning: New Writing by American Negroes, 1940–1962, ed. Herbert Hill.

1963

Miguel Angel Asturias. Mulata de Tal.

1963

Guy des Cars. Sang d’Afrique. Vol. 1: L’Africain; vol. 2: L’Amoureuse.

1963

William Gardner Smith. The Stone Face (set in Paris; black American and Polish actress).

1964

Robert Boles. The People One Knows.

1964

Robert Gover. Here Goes Kitten (sequel to Gover 1962).

1964

Shirley Ann Grau. The Keeper of the House.

1964

Lorraine Hansberry. The Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window.

1964

Adrienne Kennedy. Funnyhouse of a Negro.

1964

LeRoi Jones. Dutchman and The Slave.

1964

Sembène Ousmane. L’Harmattan.

1964

Anna Seghers. “Die Hochzeit von Haiti” (story; see 1976 collection).

1965

Alston Anderson. All God’s Children.

1965

William Melvin Kelley. A Drop of Patience.

1965

Adrienne Kennedy. The Owl Answers.

1965

Roi Ottley. White Marble Lady.

1965

Sembène Ousmane. Le Mandat précéd’ de Véhi Ciosane.

1966

Adrienne Kennedy. A Rat’s Mass.

1966

Jean Rhys. Wide Sargasso Sea.

1966

Margaret Walker. Jubilee.

1967

Erskine Caldwell. The Weather Shelter.

1967

Ernest Gaines. Of Love and Dust.

1967

Frank Hercules. I Want a Black Doll.

1967

William Bradford Huie. The Klansman.

1967

LeRoi Jones. Tales, esp. “Going Down Slow.”

1967

William Melvin Kelley. dem.

1967

John Oliver Killens. ‘Sippi (story of Carrie Wakefield, a wealthy plantation owner’s daughter and Charley Chaney, son of a field hand).

1967

Simone and André Schwarz-Bart. Un plat de porc aux bananes vertes.

1968

James Baldwin. Tell Me How Long the Train’s Been Gone.

1968

Ernest Gaines. Bloodline.

1968

Robert Gover. J C Saves (sequel to Gover 1962 and 1964).

1969

Cecil Brown. The Life and Loves of Mr. Jiveass Nigger.

1969

Thérèse Kuoh-Moukouri. Rencontres essentielles.

1969

Clarence Major. The Night Visitors.

1969

Frank Yerby. Speak Now.

1970

“I Am Curious (Black)!” Superman’s Girl Friend Lois Lane #106. D.C. Comics (November). Script: Robert Kanigher.

1970

Hal Bennett. Lord of the Dark Places.

1970

George Cain. Blueschild Baby.

1970

Norman Daniels. Slave Rebellion.

1970

William Melvin Kelley. Dunfords Travels Everywhere.

1971

Ernest J. Gaines. The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.

1971

John Oliver Killens. The Cotillion; or, One Good Bull Is Half the Herd.

1972

Ayi Kwei Armah. Why Are We So Blest?

1972

Mbella Sonne Dipoko. Black & White in Love.

1972

André Schwarz-Bart. La Mulâtresse Solitude. Trans. Ralph Manheim, A Woman Named Solitude.

1972

Alice Walker. Meridian.

1972

John A. Williams. Captain Blackman.

1973

Leon Forrest. There Is a Tree More Ancient Than Eden (see 1977, 1983).

1973

Bessie Head. A Question of Power.

1974

Calvin Hernton. Scarecrow.

1974

Jean Gilmore Rushing. Mary Dove.

1975

Gayl Jones. Corregidora.

1976

Nuruddin Farah. A Naked Needle.

1976

Anna Seghers. Die Hochzeit von Haiti: Karibische Geschichten, esp. title story, orig. pub. 1964.

1976

Margaret Walker. Meridian.

1976

John A. Williams. The Junior Bachelor Society.

1977

Mariama Bâ. Une si longue lettre.

1977

Maurice Deneuzière. Louisiane (Prix Alexandre Dumas).

1977

Leon Forrest. The Bloodworth Orphans.

1977

Barbara Ferry Johnson. Delta Blood.

1979

Barbara Chase-Riboud. Sally Hemings.

1979

Cyrus Colter. Night Studies.

1979

Maurice Deneuzière. Fausse Rivière.

1980

Fanny Howe. The White Slave.

1981

Mariama Bâ. Un chant écarlate.

1981

Maurice Deneuzière. Bagatelle.

1981

Maurice Deneuzière. Un chien de saison.

1982

Francis Bebey. Le Fils d’Agatha Moudio.

1982

Rita Mae Brown. Southern Discomfort.

1982

Charles Johnson. Oxherding Tale.

1983

Mongo Beti. Les Deux mères de Guillaume Ismael Dzewatama futur camionneur.

1983

Leon Forrest. Two Wings to Veil My Face (see 1973, 1977).

1983

Wilson Harris. The Womb of Space: The Cross-Cultural Imagination.

1984

Mongo Beti. La Revanche de Guillaume Ismael Dzewatama.

1984

Hans Christoph Buch. Die Hochzeit von Port-au-Prince.

1984

Michele Cliff. Abeng: A Novel.

1984

Yvonne R. de Miranda. A Mulata Ana Lúcia.

1984

William Plomer. The South African Autobiography.

1984

William Plomer. Turbott Wolfe (intro. Laurens van der Pot).

1985

Maurice Deneuzière. Les Trois-chènes.

1985

Lore Segal. Her First American.

1985

John Edgar Wideman. The Homewood Trilogy: Damballah, Hiding Place, Sent for You Yesterday.

1986

Anne Garréta. Sphinx.

1986

Katharina Oguntoye, May Opitz, and Dagmar Schultz, eds. Farbe bekennen: Afro-deutsche Frauen auf den Spuren ihrer Geschichte.

1987

Maurice Deneuzière. L’Adieu au sud.

1987

Nicolás Guillén. “Mulata” (High Brown). Callaloo 10. 2 (1987): 174–75.

1987

Sally Morgan. My Place.

1988

Valerie Belgrave. Ti Marie.

1988

Abdoulaye Sadji. Nini: mulâtresse du Sénégal.

1988

Joseph Thomson. An African Romance.

1988

Tom Vidal. Schwarzer Zucker.

1989

Rachel Countryman. “A Little Bit White.” German—town Friends School Studies in Education 56 (Winter): 8–15.

1989

Rolf Lasa. Schwarze Haut, weiβe Haut.

1989

Mark Mathabane. Kaffir Boy in America: An Encounter with Apartheid.

1990

Bodo Kirchhoff. Infanta.

1991

Karin Burschik. Yves: eine afrikanische Liebe.

1991

Marien Ndaye. En famille.

1992

Eva Demski. Afra: Ein Roman in fünf Bildern.

1992

Christa Karrer. Liebesgeschichten? Schweizerinnen und Asylbewerber.

1992

Mark Mathabane and Gail Mathabane. Love in Black and White: The Triumph of Love over Prejudice and Taboo.

1992

Chima Oji. Unter die Deutschen gefallen.

1992

Jane Ray. The Story of the Creation.

1992

Barry Unsworth. Sacred Hunger.

1993

Barbara Faith. This Above All.

1993

Alex Haley (and David Stevens). Queen: The Story of an American Family.

1993

Adolf Muschg. Der Rote Ritter (a modern Parzival).

1994

John Gregory Brown. Decorations in a Ruined Cemetery.

1994

Anita Richmond Bunkley. Black Gold.

1994

Carol Camper, ed. Miscegenation Blues: Voices of Mixed Race Women.

1994

Barbara Chase-Riboud. The President’s Daughter (sequel to Sally Hemings, 1979).

1994

Rita Dove. The Darker Face of the Earth: A Verse Play in Fourteen Scenes.

1994

Lise Funderburg. Black, White, Other: Biracial Americans Talk About Race and Identity.

1994

Shirlee Taylor Haizlip. The Sweeter the Juice: A Family Memoir in Black and White.

1994

John Updike. Brazil.

1996

Love Across the Color Line: The Letters of Alice Hanley to Channing Lewis, eds. Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz and Kathy Peiss.

1996

James McBride. The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother.

1996

Scott Minerbrook. Divided to the Vein: A Journey into Race and Family.