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The National Study of Health and Growth$
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Roberto Rona and Susan Chinn

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780192629197

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192629197.001.0001

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NSHG: the auxological perspective

NSHG: the auxological perspective

Chapter:
(p.101) 15 NSHG: the auxological perspective
Source:
The National Study of Health and Growth
Author(s):

James M. Tanner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192629197.003.0015

The NSHG has made a strong contribution to auxological epidemiology. The NSHG demonstrated that monitoring of height can be carried out on a continuous basis and report results within a year of the fieldwork. The NSHG has contributed to methodological issues by showing the advantages and disadvantages of a mixed-longitudinal design in nutritional surveillance. The NSHG was also successful in using skinfold callipers for monitoring fatness in a large sample over many rears. The NSHG contributed to a better understanding of the properties of using weight-for-height and skinfold thickness in a monitoring programme. The NSHG made a lasting contribution to the understanding of secular trend of height, demonstrating for example that the secular trend of growth in Afro–Caribbean children continued at a similar rate to that of other ethnic groups, despite being already the tallest. This result provided evidence of a genetic difference in height between ethnic groups.

Keywords:   auxology, mixed-longitudinal design, secular trend, measurement reliability, monitoring

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