Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The NMDA Receptor$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

G. L. Collingridge and J. C. Watkins

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780192625021

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192625021.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 October 2018

NMDA receptors and their interactions with other excitatory amino acid receptors in synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system

NMDA receptors and their interactions with other excitatory amino acid receptors in synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system

Chapter:
(p.243) 10 NMDA receptors and their interactions with other excitatory amino acid receptors in synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system
Source:
The NMDA Receptor
Author(s):

T. E. SALT

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192625021.003.0010

This chapter seeks to review some of the electrophysiological work which has been carried out using excitatory amino acid antagonists. A selection of studies of brain areas has been chosen for review in an attempt to draw out similarities in receptor function in synaptic transmission: a common feature of these areas is that they have been the subject of intensive study, often using different electrophysiological techniques. A technique which has been widely used in studies of excitatory amino acid synaptic pharmacology, both in vivo and in vitro, is iontophoresis.

Keywords:   NMDA receptors, iontophoresis, synaptic transmission, excitatory amino acid antagonists, electrophysiology

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .