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Migraine: A Spectrum of Ideas$
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Merton Sandler and Geralyn M. Collins

Print publication date: 1990

Print ISBN-13: 9780192618108

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192618108.001.0001

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The current status of migraine therapy

The current status of migraine therapy

Chapter:
(p.278) 24. The current status of migraine therapy
Source:
Migraine: A Spectrum of Ideas
Author(s):

F. Clifford Rose

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192618108.003.0024

A recent method of preventing migraine attack has been tried on patients with premonitory symptoms, for example, irritability, excitement, euphoria, or food cravings that occur as long as twenty-four hours before the attack; these patients have been given domperidone, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, which is anti-emetic (that is, relieving nausea and vomiting) and gastro-kinetic (that is, stimulating the stomach and opening the pyloric spincter so that oral medication can be absorbed by the small gut). With premonitory symptoms of more than six hours, it can be effective in preventing migraine attacks. There is still no general agreement as to how migraine is best treated, largely because of the fact that many drugs which are used have not been scientifically evaluated by methodologically sound clinical trials.

Keywords:   migraine therapy, migraine attacks, drug use, clinical trials, domperidone, premonitory symptoms

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