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The War of WordsThe History of Broadcasting in the United Kingdom: Volume III$

Asa Briggs

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780192129567

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192129567.001.0001

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(p.663) Appendix A Establishment and Staff Numbers 1939–1945

(p.663) Appendix A Establishment and Staff Numbers 1939–1945

Source:
The War of Words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Before the war and after 1943 there was an authorized staff ‘establishment’. The outbreak of war caused such dislocation in the Staff Records Section that there was confusion as to who held an established post and who did not. Many pre-war posts were abolished, many new departments were created, and many services had to build up at immense speed. By 1943 staff numbers as given bore little relationship to pre-war ‘establishment’ lists. There were indeed three categories of employees:

  1. (1) those in an approved post, i.e. one which belonged to the pre-war establishment or one which had been approved after the outbreak of war;

  2. (2) those in a temporary post,

    1. (a) awaiting official approval, or

    2. (b) created for some immediate purpose; or

  3. (3) those in a post on an approved reserve, normally involving training.

The figures which appear in the following table must be accepted with reserve, but they set out rough numbers

3 Sept.

1939

4,889

31 Oct.

1940

5,579

31 Dec.

1941

10,504

30 Sept.

1942

11,329

31 Aug.

1943

11,521

31 Dec.

1944

11,600

Apr.

1945

11,479

In August 1941 Controller (Administration) prepared the following table setting out the functional distribution of BBC Staff. (p.664)

I

Direction

1.

Central Direction

32

2.

Direction and Management of Regions and Areas

83

3.

Finance Direction

41

156

II

Broadcasting Operations

4.

Home Programme Service

779

5.

Overseas Programme Service:

i

European Service

698

ii

Empire Service

357

iii

Latin-American Service

102

iv

Near Eastern Service

90

1,247

6.

Engineering Operational Staff

1,744

3,770

III

Other Operations

7.

Monitoring Service

495

8.

Publications

159

654

IV

Staff Management

9.

General Management and Recruitment

154

10.

Welfare

43

11.

Instructional Staff

12

12.

Pay and Records

136

345

V

Services

13.

Secretariat

56

14.

Publicity

68

15.

Technical Research, Installation, and Equipment

371

16.

Construction and Management of Premises

118

17.

Transport

119

18.

A.R.P. and Fire Services

374

19.

Armed Watchmen

64

20.

Catering and Domestic

779

21.

Office Services:

i

Buying, Stores, and Miscellaneous

123

ii

Registry

73

iii

Telephone Operators

139

iv

Duplicating

94

v

House Engineers

133

vi

Other House Staff (including Part-time Charwomen)

1,220

1,782

3,731

VI

Others

22.

Unposted Staff in Training

210

23.

Staff serving with the Forces and seconded to Government Departments, Civil Defence, etc.

827

1,037

9,693

(p.665) Throughout the war the proportion of engineers remained constant at two-fifths and the staff as a whole fell into three roughly equal categories: (a) manual, (b) clerical, (c) monthly-paid; (a) and (b) each represented rather less and (c) rather more than one-third.

In 1945 employees in the Overseas Services numbered 400 monthly-paid staff, 300 clerical, and 1,200 engineers.

Staff were scattered at various times over 250 sets of premises in and out of London. The payroll in 1945 was £4,000,000, and the great variety of professions and trades within the BBC may be illustrated by the fact that in the Ministry of Labour Schedule of Reserved Occupations BBC Engineering staff alone fell into 100 different categories.