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Democracy in the WoodsEnvironmental Conservation and Social Justice in India, Tanzania, and Mexico$
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Prakash Kashwan

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190637385

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190637385.001.0001

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Public Accountability in Policy-making

Public Accountability in Policy-making

Forest-Based Climate Change Mitigation in India, Tanzania, and Mexico

Chapter:
(p.175) Chapter 7 Public Accountability in Policy-making
Source:
Democracy in the Woods
Author(s):

Prakash Kashwan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190637385.003.0010

International negotiations regarding climate change mitigation and adaption have been such a dominant force on the global agenda that some scholars identify the push for forest-related carbon sequestration with the emerging threat of “green grabs”—the appropriation of land and resources for the purposes of environmental protection. Despite the strong influence of these international forces, analysis of carbon forestry policy proposals from India, Tanzania, and Mexico shows that the impact of international environmental policy is refracted through domestic political and economic institutions. This chapter shows that credible commitments by national governments to share REDD+ benefits with forest-dependent people are contingent on the differences of access to and leverage over the policy process. Moreover, political and administrative structures that limit the government forestry agencies’ authority lead to more responsive and accountable policy outcomes, which challenge the conventional wisdom of international organizations’ providing unqualified support to national forestry agencies.

Keywords:   forest tenure, REDD+, public accountability, safeguards, climate change mitigation, carbon forestry, subnational climate governance, UNFCCC

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