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Making Saints in Modern China$
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David Ownby, Vincent Goossaert, and Ji Zhe

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190494568

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190494568.001.0001

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Jingkong

Jingkong

From Universal Saint to Sectarian Saint

Chapter:
11 (p.394) Jingkong
Source:
Making Saints in Modern China
Author(s):

Yanfei Sun

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190494568.003.0012

Born on the mainland, Jingkong moved to Taiwan with the Guomindang and became a Pure Land monk in the 1950s. Blocked by the conservative Buddhist establishment in Taiwan, he developed a following elsewhere, notably in Australia and Singapore. He employed various technological means of offering his teachings at a distance—first audio- and videocassettes, and ultimately the Internet and podcasts—and his patient explanations of his favorite scriptures won many followers. Jingkong was well-positioned to take advantage of the spiritual hunger that marked the post-Mao period; he quickly established a following in the 1990s, using his technological mastery to build networks and win adepts. At the same time, his success and his “sectarian” emphasis on exclusive practice of his Pure Land teachings excited the jealousy of competitors and attracted the attention of state religious authorities.

Keywords:   Jingkong, Taiwan, Pure Land, Sectarianism, Internet

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