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Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine$
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Peter J. Neumann, Theodore G. Ganiats, Louise B. Russell, Gillian D. Sanders, and Joanna E. Siegel

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190492939

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190492939.001.0001

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Identifying and Quantifying the Consequences of Interventions

Identifying and Quantifying the Consequences of Interventions

Chapter:
(p.137) 6 Identifying and Quantifying the Consequences of Interventions
Source:
Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine
Author(s):

Joshua A. Salomon

Thomas A. Trikalinos

Gillian D. Sanders

Jeanne S. Mandelblatt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190492939.003.0006

There are two distinct phases in identifying and quantifying consequences: a broad and systematic review of relevant consequences of the decision being evaluated and identification of data sources and measurement approaches for quantifying them. Cost-effectiveness analyses should identify all significant consequences related to health (survival and/or health status) and resource use in the healthcare sector, as well as consequences in other sectors. Consequences may be distinguished along various dimensions, including the sector in which they occur; groups with different degrees of proximity to the intervention (target population versus other affected groups); and different time points. The Impact Inventory provides a framework for listing all consequences of an intervention, within and outside the healthcare sector, and encouraging explicit discussion of omitted elements and their likely effect on the conclusions of an analysis.

Keywords:   Consequences, health status, costs, Impact Inventory, data sources, measurement approaches

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