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Repetition and RaceAsian American Literature After Multiculturalism$

Amy C. Tang

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190464387

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190464387.001.0001

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(p.205) Bibliography

(p.205) Bibliography

Source:
Repetition and Race
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Bibliography references:

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