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Abraham's DiceChance and Providence in the Monotheistic Traditions$
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Karl W. Giberson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190277154

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190277154.001.0001

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Chance and Providence in the Islamic Tradition

Chance and Providence in the Islamic Tradition

Chapter:
(p.107) 6 Chance and Providence in the Islamic Tradition
Source:
Abraham's Dice
Author(s):

Mustafa Ruzgar

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190277154.003.0006

The Qur’anic universe works with full purpose, harmony, divine guidance, and providence. But the Qur’anic concept of providence does not obliterate the freedom of nondivine creatures. The existence of such freedom is fully compatible with a purposeful universe, understood within the appropriate metaphysical framework. Philosophers, theologians, and intellectuals in the Muslim tradition, such as Mulla Sadra, Ibn Khaldun, and Muhammad Iqbal offer important insights for interpreting Qur’anic passages relating to divine providence. In addition, some thinkers in the Islamic tradition have appropriated an approach similar to the process thought of Alfred North Whitehead to address notions of purposefulness, creation, evolution, god-world relationship, religious responsibility, and reward and punishment.

Keywords:   Qur’an, Islamic providence, purpose in Islam, chance in the Qur’an, Sufism

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