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Solitary ActionActing on Our Own in Everyday Life$
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Ira J. Cohen

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190258573

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190258573.001.0001

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Why the Invisibility of Solitary Action?

Why the Invisibility of Solitary Action?

Chapter:
(p.18) Chapter 2 Why the Invisibility of Solitary Action?
Source:
Solitary Action
Author(s):

Ira J. Cohen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190258573.003.0002

This chapter presents an extensive discussion of how other social thinkers and theorists of social interaction regard solitary action, or better put, how they disregard it. The chapter examines a broad range of social thinkers and theorists from Thomas Hobbes and Karl Marx to George Herbert Mead, Erving Goffman, and Harold Garfinkel. Readers will also find an analysis of an old literary friend, Robinson Crusoe, integrated into a pivotal discussion, as well as remarks on Bernice Martin’s social theory of housework as “magic,” which illustrates the capacity of solitary actions to provide comfort in times of trouble or distress.

Keywords:   social theory, social interaction, solitary action, Erving Goffman, Harold Garfinkel, George Herbert Mead

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