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Beyond SpeechPornography and Analytic Feminist Philosophy$
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Mari Mikkola

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190257910

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190257910.001.0001

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Getting “Naked” in The Colonial/Modern Gender System

Getting “Naked” in The Colonial/Modern Gender System

A Preliminary Trans Feminist Analysis of Pornography

Chapter:
(p.157) Chapter 8 Getting “Naked” in The Colonial/Modern Gender System
Source:
Beyond Speech
Author(s):

Talia Mae Bettcher

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190257910.003.0008

This chapter introduces the notion of “interpersonal spatiality” (the capacity of sensory and discursive encounters to admit of intimacy and distance). It examines the constitution of nakedness and sexual desire within what the author calls the sex-representational system of interpersonal spatiality. In this system, one’s public gender presentation communicates the moral structure of one’s nakedness, which is the source of transphobic invalidation. The system is also an aspect of what María Lugones calls the colonial/modern gender system. Specifically, the sex-representational system grounded the colonial “primitivization” of nonwhite individuals as well as the contrast between sexual objectification and sexual animalization, emphasized by Patricia Hill Collins. The chapter concludes with a preliminary analysis of pornography that draws on this account.

Keywords:   animalization, intimacy, objectification, pornography, sexual desire, transphobia

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