Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
American ArcadiaCalifornia and the Classical Tradition$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter J. Holliday

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190256517

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190256517.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 16 December 2018

A “Villa in a Garden” for the Masses

A “Villa in a Garden” for the Masses

Chapter:
(p.259) 9 A “Villa in a Garden” for the Masses
Source:
American Arcadia
Author(s):

Peter J. Hollida

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190256517.003.0009

After the war, more ordinary working people could afford monthly mortgage payments than ever before, reviving the vision of an arcadian existence on the West Coast. Although postwar developers favored Modern designs for their vast housing tracts, a few (Joseph Eichler) incorporated features adapted from ancient dwellings. It was not just their design but also the way Southern Californians sought to live their lives in their houses that looked back to ancient precedents. In a few exceptional cases (Trousdale Estates and Mount Olympus), developers applied classicizing features to their houses in an attempt to conjure associations of stability and permanence, and perhaps even the pretensions of upper-class prestige for their subdivisions. A new wave of immigrants deployed a classical vocabulary to express their identities in so-called Persian Palaces, which have prompted unintended negative reactions.

Keywords:   Joseph Eichler, Modernism, Mount Olympus, Persian Palace, Trousdale Estates

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .