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The Transformation of Human Rights Fact-Finding$
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Philip Alston and Sarah Knuckey

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190239480

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190239480.001.0001

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Mobile Phones, Social Media and Big Data in Human Rights Fact-Finding

Mobile Phones, Social Media and Big Data in Human Rights Fact-Finding

Possibilities, Challenges, and Limitations

Chapter:
(p.441) 21. Mobile Phones, Social Media and Big Data in Human Rights Fact-Finding
Source:
The Transformation of Human Rights Fact-Finding
Author(s):

Jay D. Aronson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190239480.003.0021

This chapter focuses on the effects of mobile phones, social media, and big data in human rights fact-finding, examining how technology, ethics, and politics interact in a variety of interesting ways in this domain. They range from much-discussed concerns about the validity of data produced through networked devices and the methods used to analyze them to the obligations of the investigator/fact-finder to protect, warn, and share relevant information with those who provide data for analysis. It becomes apparent throughout the course of this chapter that it is impossible to label any of the issues discussed as solely technical, ethical, or political in nature. As such, technologists, human rights advocates, and policymakers must work together to analyze and address them. The last section of this chapter lays out a tentative agenda for future research and action that will hopefully improve the use of networked technology in human rights fact-finding.

Keywords:   mobile phones, social media, big data, technology, future research agenda, networked technology

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