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The Anatomy of Achievement GapsWhy and How American Education is Losing (but can still Win) the War on Underachievement$

Jaekyung Lee

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190217648

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190217648.001.0001

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(p.307) Appendix A Description of National Assessment/Survey Datasets

(p.307) Appendix A Description of National Assessment/Survey Datasets

Source:
The Anatomy of Achievement Gaps
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

The following descriptions provide quick snapshots for each one of the international and US national education assessment/survey databases that have been used for research throughout this book.

International Datasets

Trends in International Math and Science Study (TIMSS)

The TIMSS 1995–2007 math assessment/survey datasets include data for students at grades 4 and 8. The math assessment/survey 1995, 1999, 2003, and 2007 datasets involve repeated cross-sectional samples of fourth-graders (1999 data unavailable for grade 4) from 23 nations, and eighth-graders from 36 nations including the United States and Korea.

Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)

The PISA 2000–09 reading and math datasets include data for students at age 15. The reading and math assessment/survey 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 datasets involve repeated cross-sectional samples of 15-yearolds from 34 countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), including the United States and Korea.

(p.308) US National Datasets

1. Repeated cross-sectional (or quasi-longitudinal) data

Long-Term Trend National Assessment of Educational Progress (Long-Term NAEP)

The NAEP long-term trend assessments give information on reading and math achievement at ages 9, 13, and 17 since the early 1970s. Repeated cross-sectional national assessment/survey data were collected from 1971 through 2008 in reading, and from 1978 through 2008 in math.

Main National Assessment of Educational Progress (Main NAEP)

The NAEP main assessments provide more up-to-date, standards-based information since 1990 on national reading and math achievement at grades 4, 8, and 12. Repeated cross-sectional national assessment/survey data were collected from 1994 through 2007 in reading, and from 1992 through 2007 in math.

2. Longitudinal data

Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth (ECLS-B)

The ECLS-B provides information about children who were born in 2001 and entered kindergarten for the first time (i.e., fall of 2006 or fall of 2007); data from the ECLS-B are not representative of kindergartners; rather, the data are representative of the children born in the United States in 2001 at kindergarten entry. For ECLS-B, the analytical sample was restricted to children born in 2001 whose reading and math knowledge/skills were assessed at both age 4 and in kindergarten and also whose early intellectual abilities were assessed at around age 9 months and 24 months.

Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K)

The ECLS-K database provides a nationally representative sample of kindergartners from the fall of 1998. This book used reading and math IRT scores collected at the fall and spring of the kindergarten year, and the spring of grades 1, 3, 5, and 8.

(p.309) High School & Beyond (HS&B)

The HS&B database was collected from a nationally representative sample of students in tenth grade in 1980. This book used data from the first two waves of data collection, grades 10 and 12. Reading and math (basic and advanced math combined) scores from each wave were used to analyze academic growth. In order to explore the achievement trajectories among typical students, the sample used for this book is comprised of only students who were in school and in the normal grade at each wave: grade 10 in the spring of 1980 and grade 12 in the spring of 1982.

National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS: 88)

The NELS: 88 database was drawn from a nationally representative sample of students in eighth grade in 1988. This book used data from the first three waves of data collection, grades 8, 10, and 12. Reading and math IRT scores from each wave were used to analyze academic growth. In order to explore the achievement trajectories among typical students, the sample used for this book is comprised of only students who were in school and in the normal grade at each wave (in grade 8 for the first time in the fall of 1988, in grade 10 in the spring of 1990, and in grade 12 in the spring of 1992).

Educational Longitudinal Study (ELS)

The ELS database was drawn from a nationally representative sample of students in tenth grade in 2002. This book used data from the first two waves of data collection, grades 10 and 12. Math IRT scores from each wave were used to analyze academic growth; reading scores are available in tenth grade only. In order to explore the achievement trajectories among typical students, the sample used for this book is comprised of only students who were in school and in the correct grade at each wave: grade 10 in the spring of 2002 and grade 12 in the spring of 2004.

South Korea National Datasets

Korea Educational Longitudinal Study (KELS)

The KELS data provides a nationally representative sample of South Korean seventh-graders (N = 6,908) in 2005; that is, Korean students in the first year of middle school. It gives longitudinal academic assessment and survey data at (p.310) every middle and high school grade (7–12) and the year right after high school graduation. Research in the book used a subset of students who participated in the 2011 seventh-round survey when they made the transition from high school to college, military, or work (N = 4,844).

Korea National Assessment of Educational Achievement (KNAEA)

KNAEA data give information on Korean language, English, social studies, science and math achievement from a nationally representative sample of students at grades 6, 9, and 10 since 2003. Repeated cross-sectional national assessment/survey data are drawn from 2003 through 2009.