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Eliot Bates

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190215736

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190215736.001.0001

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Arranging the Black Sea

Arranging the Black Sea

Chapter:
(p.231) 9 Arranging the Black Sea
Source:
Digital Tradition
Author(s):

Eliot Bates

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190215736.003.0009

Chapter 9 examines six different contemporary album recordings of music originating in the Eastern Black Sea (Karadeniz). All six songs make some kind of contemporary representation of the Black Sea (either locally or regionally), an effect most clearly accomplished with the use of the locally specific instruments such as the kemençe and tulum. However, much of the labor of studio musicianship, arrangement, and engineering far exceeds a sole concern with representation, being concerned instead with the regionally unspecific aesthetic conventions of arranged ethnic music. Therefore, arrangement as practice largely concerns everything that exceeds the basic needs for properly performing a song. This chapter employs DAW session analysis, spectral analysis, and score-based and lyrical analysis modes.

Keywords:   arrangement, Black Sea (Karadeniz), kemençe, representation, studio musicianship, tulum

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