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The Business of America is LobbyingHow Corporations Became Politicized and Politics Became More Corporate$
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Lee Drutman

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190215514

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190215514.001.0001

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Testing Alternative Explanations for Growth

Testing Alternative Explanations for Growth

Chapter:
(p.168) 8 Testing Alternative Explanations for Growth
Source:
The Business of America is Lobbying
Author(s):

Lee Drutman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190215514.003.0008

This chapter tests alternative explanations for the growth of lobbying. It analyzes three possible explanations: Government is getting “bigger”; government is devoting more attention to issues of concern to the lobbying growth industries; and companies are getting bigger; and there is a herd effect in certain industries. Government has gotten bigger, and the growing size of government may exert a diffuse pull on corporate lobbying expenditures. Government has also shifted its attention. However, in some of the key growth industries, changes in government attention (as measured by congressional hearings and bill introductions) do very little to explain the growth patterns. None of these explanations can offer a theory of why corporate lobbying has expanded and grown as it has. Rather, industry-level lobbying seems to have an internal logic of growth.

Keywords:   business, lobbying, government, congressional hearings, congressional bill introductions

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