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The Morphosyntax-Phonology ConnectionLocality and Directionality at the Interface$
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Vera Gribanova and Stephanie S. Shih

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190210304

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190210304.001.0001

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The Directionality and Locality of Allomorphic Conditioning in Optimal Construction Morphology

The Directionality and Locality of Allomorphic Conditioning in Optimal Construction Morphology

Chapter:
(p.285) 11 The Directionality and Locality of Allomorphic Conditioning in Optimal Construction Morphology
Source:
The Morphosyntax-Phonology Connection
Author(s):

Sharon Inkelas

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190210304.003.0011

This chapter explores the conditioning of allomorphy in Optimal Construction Morphology (OCM; Caballero & Inkelas 2013), a highly lexicalist theory of morphology. OCM differs from other lexicalist theories (e.g. Lexical Morphology and Phonology; Kiparsky 1982) in having both top-down and bottom-up design features. OCM’s unique architecture generates novel predictions regarding the directionality and locality of conditioning of morphological operations. OCM predicts that allomorphy which is conditioned by arbitrary lexical properties of other morphs in the same word will exhibit an inside-out and potentially local character, whereas allomorphy which is conditioned by properties of the meaning of the word is subject to neither directionality nor locality considerations. This asymmetry arises from the fundamental claim in OCM that word formation is driven by an abstract meaning target, and is illustrated with case studies from Nanti, Nimboran, and Totonac.

Keywords:   allomorphy, locality, percolation, word formation, Optimal Construction Morphology, Distributed Morphology, Lexical Morphology and Phonology, blocking, multiple exponence

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