Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Economic Development and Environmental SustainabilityNew Policy Options$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ramón López and Michael A. Toman

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199298006

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2006

DOI: 10.1093/0199298009.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 December 2017

Natural Capital, Resource Dependency, and Poverty in Developing Countries: The Problem of ‘Dualism within Dualism’

Natural Capital, Resource Dependency, and Poverty in Developing Countries: The Problem of ‘Dualism within Dualism’

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 Natural Capital, Resource Dependency, and Poverty in Developing Countries: The Problem of ‘Dualism within Dualism’
Source:
Economic Development and Environmental Sustainability
Author(s):

López Ramón

Michael A. Toman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199298009.003.0002

There are currently two types of ‘dualism’ in patterns of resource use within developing countries that are relevant to the problem of resource degradation and poverty. The first ‘dualism’ concerns aggregate resource use and dependency within the global economy. The second ‘dualism’ concerns aggregate resource use and dependency within a developing economy. This ‘dualism within dualism’ pattern is symptomatic of a process of resource-based development, accompanied by substantial resource conversion, which often leads to benefits that are inequitably distributed. To reverse this ‘vicious cycle’, specific policies must be aimed at overcoming the structural features of ‘dualism within dualism’ in resource use patterns. Second, policies must also be introduced that improve the overall success of resource-based development that is accompanied by frontier land expansion. Specific policies include reform of land, tax, credit, and other economic policies that generally reinforce the dominance of wealthier households in natural resource and land markets, and promote the speculative investment in these resources as tax shelters.

Keywords:   developing nations, agro-industrialization, integration, frontier, resource, expansion, resource conversion

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .