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Reforming Early Retirement in Europe, Japan and the USA$
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Bernhard Ebbinghaus

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199286119

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2006

DOI: 10.1093/0199286116.001.0001

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The Production‐Push Factors: The Political Economy of Labor Shedding

The Production‐Push Factors: The Political Economy of Labor Shedding

Chapter:
(p.157) Chapter 6 The Production‐Push Factors: The Political Economy of Labor Shedding
Source:
Reforming Early Retirement in Europe, Japan and the USA
Author(s):

Bernhard Ebbinghaus (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199286116.003.0006

This chapter analyzes the economic ‘push’ factors that lead to early exit from work. Some firms co-sponsor early retirement via occupational pensions in order to facilitate restructuring. Deindustrialization, mass unemployment, and privatization have increased structural push, with early exit spreading widely across sectors. Two varieties of capitalism can be observed: early exit is used by firms to adapt to regulated labor markets in Continental coordinated market economies, it is more cyclical and infrequent in Anglophone flexible labor markets, while Japan and Sweden are exceptional cases that integrate older workers.

Keywords:   early retirement, restructuring, occupational pensions, employers, works councils, production systems, flexible labor market, employment regulation

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