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In Defence of Christianity$
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Brian Hebblethwaite

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199276790

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2005

DOI: 10.1093/019927679X.001.0001

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A Case for Incarnational and A Case for Incarnational and Trinitarian Belief

A Case for Incarnational and A Case for Incarnational and Trinitarian Belief

Chapter:
(p.110) 5 A Case for Incarnational and Trinitarian Belief
Source:
In Defence of Christianity
Author(s):

Brian Hebblethwaite

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/019927679X.003.0005

This chapter argues that the doctrines developed over time, in order to make best sense of the historical phenomena considered in the last two chapters, themselves contribute to the cumulative case for Christian belief, in so far as their logic, their scope and their power provide the most theoretically and existentially convincing account of existence, predicament and its resolution, and of what one may hope for. While what the different world religions have in common needs to be borne in mind, the case for Christianity depends chiefly on the logic and power of the doctrines of the Incarnation and the Trinity. The chapter ends with a brief exposition of the religious significance of Christian soteriology — its understanding of salvation and eschatology — its hope for the ultimate future of creation.

Keywords:   doctrines, logic, hope, Incarnation, Trinity, soteriology, eschatology

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